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Blog Comments

  1. Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    Your blog begs a few questions from me, Keith. How many of us that display our work truly take size and perspective into account? How many of us really wrap our heads around how we want the final print to appear to the viewer after the contrast control and the toning? How many of us stand in front of prints of differing sizes from differing distances in order to guage the impact it will have on the viewer? How many of us cast lighting on the print from a million different angles of varying degrees of intensity? What about surrounding furniture, etc.?

    We all have a vision in mind for our work and it sells oneself short to stop the vision two-thirds of the way from inception to completion. You expose it. Your process and print it. Now you must engage the viewer in your presentation as well or you have let yourself down as an artist.

    And I will practice what I preach in the Blind Print Exchange. I have not given such things much thought myself as a new printer. But I will from here on out.

    Thank you for expressing these wonderful thoughts, Keith. Mission accomplished.
    Updated 09-23-2009 at 06:59 PM by Christopher Walrath
  2. Agamennon2000's Avatar
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    I know one of those essays were mine...
  3. keithwms's Avatar
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    Postscript....

    In an interview published in the October 2009 issue of Focus, Sarah Hasted makes several interesting points on this topic of print scale. She is the co-owner of the Hasted Hunt gallery which exhibits several extremely large colour prints.

    - forging a wall-size color photograph would be "impossible and horribly expensive." (Especially the dye transfer prints, it seems)

    - it's hard to pinpoint when the extremely large picture market started, but "not as long as 20 years. Maybe more like ten, Fifteen maximum."

    And my favourite quote from the article....

    -"The size of the picture needs to match the aesthetic of the work. If they're just making big pictures to make big pictures.... it's pretty wallpaper."
  4. EASmithV's Avatar
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    Action 4x5, HELL YEAH
  5. keithwms's Avatar
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    How so?
  6. Pepper P's Avatar
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    Your works remind me of portraits in Fairfield County
  7. keithwms's Avatar
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    Thanks John!

    Now, one of these days I am going to attempt to write more succinctly, in your haiku-esque style ;
  8. viridari's Avatar
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    CiM stalling? OK you've at least got a photo to publish now.

    I'm sort of a newbie. It's hard for me to write on any authoritative level to this audience. But I'm a prolific photographer.
  9. jnanian's Avatar
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    what a great story!
    thanks for posting this, and the images
    from your journey.

    - john
  10. Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    I made the decision to step away for a while due to lack of freshness. And as a result I have been carrying my Zeiss 35mm RF with me. No pics, but I have it. I have rediscovered an old hobby, astronomy.


 

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