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  1. #11
    donkee's Avatar
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    I use Ilford FP4 and B&W contrast filters. The Tourist can be used with a cable release. Look on the upper right side (camera facing forward as if you were taking a photo) there is a silver screw. Unscrew it and insert cable release, press button, photo taken. Don't lose the screw. Have fun.

  2. #12
    LJH
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    A word of warning against Efke (and Foma, Lucky, Shanghai, etc) and cameras like these.
    The red window that shows the frame numbers will fog the film through the poor quality backing paper these films feature.
    I've had plenty of old folding and box cameras, and they all did this.
    The only ones that work well are Kodak, Ilford, and Fuji. At least if you shoot in daylight. Shading the window does not seem to help.
    Strange; I've shot heaps of Efke on my 6x17 that has NO red filter over the frame window with no fogging. In fact, it has 3 uncovered windows (one for 6x12, 6x15 and 6x17).

  3. #13
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LJH View Post
    Strange; I've shot heaps of Efke on my 6x17 that has NO red filter over the frame window with no fogging. In fact, it has 3 uncovered windows (one for 6x12, 6x15 and 6x17).
    That is indeed strange. I was just citing my personal experience with these films.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  4. #14
    LJH
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    That is indeed strange. I was just citing my personal experience with these films.
    Thanks, Thomas.

    Perhaps it is a difference in the 617's design? It does seem that the film sits deeply in the holder, and the actual windows are somewhat small.

    I'm waiting for (my first) 6x9 camera to arrive (I need something easy to carry compared to my 7x17" beast), so I'll get a better idea about it once I can compare.

    Disappointing if it does fog. I was looking forward to seeing the results of some Efke from the Ikon.

    If you have used it, have you had the same results from Adox films?

  5. #15
    SMBooth's Avatar
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    I have not had fogging using cheap film but I have had frame number and dots imprinted on the image, it not caused by light either because it all 3 rows of information not just the row which lines up with the counter window.

  6. #16
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    6 X 9 Kodaks

    Quote Originally Posted by Aristotle80 View Post
    Ah! Good information. Much thanks everyone. I shall obtain some Ilford Pan F and try it at the original range of exposure indexes. Nope, no pinholes in the bellows. I've got an Agfa Isolette with three or four holes in the bellows that I coated in liquid rubber insulator, so I knew what to look for in terms of light leaks. It's amazing to me that Kodak's bellows on both of their folders are like new when the Agfa's is relatively threadbare.
    I've a Tourist, a Monitor and a Special 120/620 Kodaks with "Special" (in red) lenses and good shutters. All perform admirably after a good shutter cleaning and finding the "sweet spot" by mounting them on a Baby Graphic for tests.

    Film choices are wide (after rolling on 620 spools) and the good shutters mean you aren't limited by film speed.

    I have also put NOS bellows on several Edwardian 120 Kodak folders with "interesting" results.

    My Agfa and Zeiss rangefinder 120 cameras work fine. The Kodak "Special" lenses are perhaps better than one may find on the German cameras and the shutters are as good. I nearly always get good results from the Kodaks with the guesstimate method of focusing. Infinity and hyperfocal distance never change. Use a tripod.

    Sid

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