Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,900   Posts: 1,584,393   Online: 726
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 22
  1. #11
    AgX
    AgX is offline

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Germany
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    9,078
    I'm more worried about the condensator. That is why I did not start up my unit yet. I once had the tiny RFI-condensator of my kitchenmixer explode... I would not like to experience that with a flashlight condensator. Maybe one should exchange any of those old ones with new ones. The newer are smaller, so likely there will be no problem with mounting.

  2. #12
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Misissauaga Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,939
    Images
    29
    Finding new electrolytics rated to the voltage needed to work in photo flashes can be a challenge. Vendors catering to vacuum tube equipment rebuilds comes closest, but they with voltage compatibility usually don't stock ones with large enought capacitance ratings.

    His capacitors/condensors might actually be foil and paper in oil, rather than the moist paste of a modern electrolytic capacitor.
    my real name, imagine that.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Outside Boston, MA
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    189
    Replacement electrolytic capacitors may be found in the primary of a switching power supply (try disassembling an old PC supply for parts) -- they're usually rated for 600V and of fairly high capacitance.
    wax/Paper and mica caps can be replaced with ceramics.

    The vibrator is a device from hell -- you'll not find a replacement unless you're extremely fortunate. Their function in modern equipment has been replaced by a pair of transistors...

    If I were rehabbing this flash, I think I would opt to replace the voltage converter with a switching supply. Just treat it as a "circuit block" and put a modern version in -- far less trouble in the long run and you would end up with loads of extra space as a bonus!

  4. #14
    AgX
    AgX is offline

    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Germany
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    9,078
    One should distinguish between standard capacitors as used in power supplies and those designed for flash discharging. The latter are available from the electronic industry via their dealers.

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Adirondacks
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,679
    Quote Originally Posted by Ruben.Vallinga View Post
    I was wondering what was number 32, so it is an alternating current generator, thanks!
    The flash does not fire under 6 volts.
    because the conductive contacts lost power. I thought it was a changeover contact.
    I had it replaced with a changeover relay, it did not work.
    Now I know why, it was not a changeover contact, but an alternating current generator. can you still get new?
    hopefully it works well with a working AC generator
    There are solid state replacements for the mechanical vibrators. If the contacts in the old vibrator have pitted, there are problems in the associated circuitry. Contrary to legend, vibrators are reliable when used properly.

  6. #16
    pentaxpete's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Brentwood, Essex, England
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    174
    Images
    105
    I bought a 'Braun Hobby Automatic' unit for £14 in the Canadian Maple Leaf store near Iserlohn when I was there in Germany with the British Army in 1957 -- in England with all the Taxes they were over £39 !! It had a power pack held from the shoulder and had the 'Vibrator' and two small lead acid batteries and a mains lead -- I got a second flash head for it - some years later I was GIVEN another unit and later 'rescued' some more Braun Hobbys from a Photographer who was taking them to the Council Dump -- I cleaned off all the mud and dust and plugged them into the mains and they WORKED -- I STILL use several 1950's Braun Hobby units and an EF300 with extra flash heads -- all working off the mains only - no batteries available any more !
    An 'Old Dog still learning New Tricks !

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Central Florida, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,076
    You think?

    Usually, after the vibrator is just a plain transformer and after that, a rectifying and filtering circuit. There's not much goes wrong there other than plain aging of components...

    I played with vibrators when I had a GE Progress Line transmitters configured for mobile use. As OP and myself obtained these devices well used and with unknown history, reliability is pretty much in doubt. It'll be fun to restore it and I'd do it. (in fact I did) Would it be reliable enough for me to trust it? no....

    Can you still get solid state replacements?? I know they existed for a while when these devices were actively used after their manufacturers declared EOL. I'm curious now...
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Adirondacks
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,679
    Quote Originally Posted by tkamiya View Post
    You think?

    Usually, after the vibrator is just a plain transformer and after that, a rectifying and filtering circuit. There's not much goes wrong there other than plain aging of components...

    I played with vibrators when I had a GE Progress Line transmitters configured for mobile use. As OP and myself obtained these devices well used and with unknown history, reliability is pretty much in doubt. It'll be fun to restore it and I'd do it. (in fact I did) Would it be reliable enough for me to trust it? no....

    Can you still get solid state replacements?? I know they existed for a while when these devices were actively used after their manufacturers declared EOL. I'm curious now...
    The vibrators drove a transformer, and there were capacitors in the circuit to prevent the contacts pitting. The size of these capacitors is critical both for efficiency and long contact life.

    There were synchronous vibrators, too - they had two sets of contacts and rectified the current from the secondary of the transformer.
    The replacement was essentially a solid state multivibrator with two hefty transistors, one could be home made pretty easily.

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Central Florida, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,076
    You mean caps ACROSS the contacts?? I wish I kept my old GE.... that was a neat piece of history....
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Adirondacks
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,679
    Quote Originally Posted by tkamiya View Post
    You mean caps ACROSS the contacts?? I wish I kept my old GE.... that was a neat piece of history....
    Yes, but the size of the caps is somewhat critical because they are also across the primary of the transformer. When everything is right, the contacts last a very long time and reliabilty is good. A huge number of car radios used vibrators. I have a Philco portable radio which uses a two volt lead acid storage battery to light the tube filaments and drive a vibrator supply for the plate voltage. The original vibrator is still good after nearly 75 years and the radio weighs about 25 pounds.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin