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  1. #1

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    Braun hobby 100 Flash 1955

    Hello forum members,


    I have this old flash purchased.
    He works on mains, the battery is missing unfortunately.
    does anyone know of you what the appropriate voltage of this battery?


    Thanks!
    in this link you can see the photos:
    https://www.dropbox.com/sh/lnzl4oy3f5rdsrg/ld2jdmSn3L


    my exususes for my bad english, I'm a Dutchman


    Sincerely,
    Ruben Vallinga

  2. #2
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    The larger early flashguns I used had 12v lead acid batteries. I may have something in a BJP Almanac with details on this flash, I'll look tomorrow.

    Welcome to APUG BTW.

    Ian

  3. #3

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    Wow...

    That's some seriously old equipment! A device labeled 32 in diagram and you have in your hand in two photographs is called a "vibrator" and is a mechanical device to create AC from DC. It was notoriously unreliable when new and probably more so now. Picture 28 shows the contacts are quite pitted. It, at minimum, require a good cleaning. When it fails, I don't think you can find a replacement. Likely, this device is used when the unit is in battery operation only - to step up and charge a large capacitor bank. I say all this because I am not sure I would recommend spending all that money to refit this with a new set of batteries.

    Anyway, nice find and it will surely make an interesting project. I am just not sure if it's practical try to use this in portable operation.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  4. #4
    AgX
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    I got the predecessor; similar neat outer, a bit less edgy. Technically different.
    I do not have mine at hand, but if my memory does not fail it takes alternatively 4 round primary batteries or a rechargable battery-pack. Thus that would mean 6V.

    In the manual (photo #2) two different lighting angles (50° and 70°) are depicted. How does that work?
    Last edited by AgX; 01-15-2013 at 07:34 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  5. #5
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
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    I have a Braun Hobby EF300, or something like that, made circa 1967. Solid state oscillator.

    It originally used 2 4V wet cell batterys. The manual shows little float ball tubes and filler caps like your item #26.

    I found my ocillator worked (very slowly) on a 6V battery, and later once I knew the oscillator worked, and allowed the capacitor to reform, I ordered 4 2V gelled lead acid batteries (Hawker Cyclones) , and built a box under the flash pack to house them, as they did not have the same form factor as the original wet cell batteries.
    my real name, imagine that.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    The larger early flashguns I used had 12v lead acid batteries. I may have something in a BJP Almanac with details on this flash, I'll look tomorrow.

    Welcome to APUG BTW.

    Ian
    thank you! I've found what voltage should be on it.
    That is 6 volts

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by tkamiya View Post
    Wow...

    That's some seriously old equipment! A device labeled 32 in diagram and you have in your hand in two photographs is called a "vibrator" and is a mechanical device to create AC from DC. It was notoriously unreliable when new and probably more so now. Picture 28 shows the contacts are quite pitted. It, at minimum, require a good cleaning. When it fails, I don't think you can find a replacement. Likely, this device is used when the unit is in battery operation only - to step up and charge a large capacitor bank. I say all this because I am not sure I would recommend spending all that money to refit this with a new set of batteries.

    Anyway, nice find and it will surely make an interesting project. I am just not sure if it's practical try to use this in portable operation.

    I was wondering what was number 32, so it is an alternating current generator, thanks!
    The flash does not fire under 6 volts.
    because the conductive contacts lost power. I thought it was a changeover contact.
    I had it replaced with a changeover relay, it did not work.
    Now I know why, it was not a changeover contact, but an alternating current generator. can you still get new?
    hopefully it works well with a working AC generator

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by AgX View Post
    I got the predecessor; similar neat outer, a bit less edgy. Technically different.
    I do not have mine at hand, but if my memory does not fail it takes alternatively 4 round primary batteries or a rechargable battery-pack. Thus that would mean 6V.

    In the manual (photo #2) two different lighting angles (50° and 70°) are depicted. How does that work?

    that's right I'm already learned that it was 6 volt, thanks!


    you can change the angle by the white head to rotate.
    then, the lamp further forward or further to the rear

  9. #9
    AgX
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    I thought of changing the position of lamp to alter the lighting angle, though I did not thought the bulb fixture could be turned.
    My unit has to two electrical devices that have to be interchanged, you only show one, the hacking device.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ruben.Vallinga View Post
    I was wondering what was number 32, so it is an alternating current generator, thanks!
    The flash does not fire under 6 volts.
    because the conductive contacts lost power. I thought it was a changeover contact.
    I had it replaced with a changeover relay, it did not work.
    Now I know why, it was not a changeover contact, but an alternating current generator. can you still get new?
    hopefully it works well with a working AC generator


    No, that device is NO LONGER MADE. You see an orange blob at the top with wire hanging out? That is a coil. When energized, it swings the arm one way. Once it does, a small contact breaks connection and the arm swings back. When it swings back, contact makes again and the magnet gets energized so the arm swings again. It'll keep doing that.

    It is supposed to vibrate and make noise. Buuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuummmmmm....

    If you are handy with electronics, you could make sure the contact is clean and the coil is intact. Then perhaps rebuild it yourself. I would not put hope on finding it new or even new-old-stock. I'm sorry, it's seriously old....
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

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