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  1. #21

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    It is an APAC enlarger not a APEC. Sorry

  2. #22

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    That sounds pretty neat. Unfortunately I ended up with a Federal 296 that handles up to 6x9 negatives. I never could track down a 4x5 enlarger of the period.

  3. #23
    Mr_Flibble's Avatar
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    The General Electric GE 8DW58Y4 light meter was a late war meter that was sold through the US Army Post Exchange. These would be marked as such on their data-tags.

  4. #24

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    Most photographers would have used tables or calculators or flash bulbs. The calculators will still have survived. I used a Kodak one till '64.

    Some not necessarily a majority would have used a photo electric meter

    They would have bracketed more.

    The films were slower in speed and had a larger safety factor.

    Think kodachrome was 10 ISO!

    The Westons were calibrated in Weston until the Weston III this was a 1/3 of a stop offset from ISO/ASA

    Until 1960 the mono films still had a 2.5 stop safety factor for people using tables and calculators. They then reduced it to 1.25 stop cause most people had meters by then.

    The tables had more rules than sunny side f/16...

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kawaiithulhu View Post
    For a project I'm piecing together I'm looking for info on light meters that would have been used during war time, or in the 1940s. Especially ones that might still work Other than random google searches is there a good source of wartime photography anyone can recommend?

    I'm covered on historical cameras from hobby to combat photo models and have a fair handle on the darkroom setups and chemistry already.

    Thanks!
    sunny16 in the South Pacific and foggy11 in Europe.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  6. #26
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    GI Photographer

    As a fledgling Army still photo. I shot a 4X5 speed using the front shutter with flash. Never used a light meter but almost always flash and always using the solenoid. Usually cut film for grip-and-grins etc. and tri-X film packs in press situations. My lab chief, who survived POW, would not think of anything else, Rollei for color print, and 35mm was only for slides.

    Sid

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by puderse View Post
    As a fledgling Army still photo. I shot a 4X5 speed using the front shutter with flash. Never used a light meter but almost always flash and always using the solenoid. Usually cut film for grip-and-grins etc. and tri-X film packs in press situations. My lab chief, who survived POW, would not think of anything else, Rollei for color print, and 35mm was only for slides.

    Sid
    Wasn't the old press saying "f8 and be there" (with flash).
    "Far more critical than what we know or do not know is what we do not want to know." - Eric Hoffer

  8. #28
    Mr_Flibble's Avatar
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    Yes, "f/8 and be there" was a sort of large-format point&shoot tactic used by the Press I believe.
    Camera at f/8 and a certain shutter speed, at a given distance from the subject and let the flash take care of the rest.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr_Flibble View Post
    Yes, "f/8 and be there"
    Pretty close; except with tri-X its more like 11 or 16! plenty of light and plenty of DoF. Don't ever come back with a shot out of focus! You can print through a bullet proof neg but you can't fix bad focus.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by AgX View Post
    Official exposure meter of US Forces in WWII:

    -) Weston Photronic
    -) Weston 819
    -) Weston 650
    -) Weston 715
    -) General Electric DV48
    -) DeJur Critic
    When this thread came out, I was curious so picked up the GE and DeJur meters for less than $5 each on eBay. They work, they just don't work as one would hope.

    I dunno if they ever worked what we would consider "well." Sunny-16 is more accurate than they are now. They both would be handy in combat situations though. You could kill someone with a blow to the head with one of these things.

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