Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,768   Posts: 1,516,490   Online: 870
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    5

    Kodachrome/Ektachrome sheet film? Help me identify these.

    Dear APUG Members,

    I recently bought a box of color transparency's, which were advertised as being from the 1930s/1940s, but i am not quite sure what kind they are.
    Maybe the APUG community would be so kind to help me with this?

    There are 2 kinds of transparency's in the box:

    - (1) Good color and sharpness with a silverish emulsion on the back. When you look at the back and turn it a bit sideways it looks like a negative, but when you look at it from the glossy front it looks normal. Image size (not counting the black borders of the transparency): 5.9 by 5.6cm and a bit under 6 by 9cm

    - (2) Less/washed out color and a bit less sharp. Glossy on both sides (no silverish emulsion). These have a 7 digit number at the side and about 5 of them are dated 1949. Image size (not counting the black borders of the transparency): 5.9 by 5.6cm

    Could number 1 be Kodachrome sheet film and number 2 be Ektachrome sheet film? Or were there any other color films availible in the 1930s/1940s in these sizes?

    I really hope someone could help me identify these. Please also see the pictures in the attachment (either numbered 1 or 2)

    Thank you.

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Ottawa, Ontario
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    168
    Could be Dufaycolor.
    Can you see ruled lines under magnification?

    Mike

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by BainDarret View Post
    Could be Dufaycolor.
    Can you see ruled lines under magnification?

    Mike
    Hi Mike,

    Thank you for your response but i am pretty sure that they aren't dufaycolor. When i look at them under a 60x - 100x microscope there aren't any lines visible.

    Florian

  4. #4
    rthomas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    North Carolina
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,099
    I have a partial box of Kodachrome 4x5" sheet film, expired February of 1949, with the following notch code:

    \/ \/ \__/ \__/

    If your film doesn't have this, I would guess it's not Kodachrome sheet film. Could it be a rollfilm format that's been cut down to single frames?

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by rthomas View Post
    I have a partial box of Kodachrome 4x5" sheet film, expired February of 1949, with the following notch code:

    \/ \/ \__/ \__/

    If your film doesn't have this, I would guess it's not Kodachrome sheet film. Could it be a rollfilm format that's been cut down to single frames?
    It could be rollfilm they are definitely cut by hand. Did all kodachrome sheet film have notch codes? Maybe the notch code might have been cut off.
    If it isn't sheet film which company's did make medium format color rollfilm in the 1940s ?

  6. #6
    michaelbsc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    South Carolina
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,092
    Images
    5
    What Kodachrome has, if you look at the emulsion side, is a very, very slight relief of the image. Other color processes are flat.
    Michael Batchelor
    Industrial Informatics, Inc.
    www.industrialinformatics.com

    The camera catches light. The photographer catches life.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Penfield, NY
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    971
    They actually look like Agfachrome images to me.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by michaelbsc View Post
    What Kodachrome has, if you look at the emulsion side, is a very, very slight relief of the image. Other color processes are flat.
    The emulsion side is totally flat, so then they are definitely not kodachrome. Does anyone know of a other 1940s medium format color film?

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    5
    Quote Originally Posted by Prof_Pixel View Post
    They actually look like Agfachrome images to me.
    Do you mean number 1 or 2? Was Agfachrome around in the 1940s or did you mean Agfacolor? And did they make medium format? Sorry for all the questions but i don't know very much about the history of Agfa color films

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Penfield, NY
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    971
    Since the Agfa reversal film I shot was in the late '50s, it was Agfachrome. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agfacolor

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin