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  1. #11
    tony lockerbie's Avatar
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    Brownies are great fun as are all the box cameras. I tend to use the ones with built in yellow and close up filters, makes them more versatile. My current user is a Flash 111 and I use tri-x with the filter in place. Another good 'un is the Zeiss box tengor which has sort of focussing and variable apertures. I am starting to add classics to my web page and have already two cameras up. I'm doing box cameras this month and should have it posted by the next day or two. Nothing too deep just a brief overview and a cople of photos taken with that particular camera- gives me an excuse to get out and use them! You can access the site by googling Tony Lockerbie (first light photography)

  2. #12
    Michel Hardy-Vallée's Avatar
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    The neat thing to do with Brownies is to put slide film in them (see some pics in my gallery). The color saturation is surprising but because the lenses are not corrected you get way cool faded colors effect. Plus you can invest in a flash unit and play with bulbs (see my avatar) to simplify exposure even more.
    Using film since before it was hip.


    "One of the most singular characters of the hyposulphites, is the property their solutions possess of dissolving muriate of silver and retaining it in considerable quantity in permanent solution" — Sir John Frederick William Herschel, "On the Hyposulphurous Acid and its Compounds." The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, Vol. 1 (8 Jan. 1819): 8-29. p. 11

    My APUG Portfolio

  3. #13

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    Dec 2005
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    Brownie Holiday Flash Camera.

    Just went into one of my dressers and pulled out this camera, is this the same one you are talking about, i think we bought it in either 52 or 55.
    The camera is dark brown in color, to open it has on each side 2 crome slides made out of metal that you push down to open the camera to put the film in and the neck or carrying strp is attached to it.
    On the cameras left side with you looking at it from the front it is to your right there are 3 round metal pieces sticking out, the top one is solid with a small tit sticking out like to make contack, # 2 down is threaded on the inside, # 3 is center drilled open, like a to put a male end in it.

    The face of the camera is metal with 2 small screws holding the face plate on, round the camera lens which is dard brown in color it reads Made in the U.S.A. by Eastman Kodak Company.
    Then it says Kodet Lens, on the main body of the camera all it has is YMRR in capitol letters in side and a serial # on the back piece, the serial # is 125480, that is all the information that is on the camera.

    Mike.

  4. #14
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    The Brownie Holiday Flash is a little different from the Brownie Hawkeye Flash -- first, it probably takes 127 film, and has a different viewfinder arrangement. The flash connector is the standard one for Kodak in the 1950s; there were at least four models of flash that fit that connector, from the oldest that uses #5 and 25 bulbs (big bayonet types that will leave your subjects seeing spots for hours) to the last version, the Supermite, that uses AG-1 (and a European version that use Phillips PF-1 baseless bulbs) -- there was also a version for M2 and M3, and the Rotary Flasholder that held *six* M2 or M3 and allowed changing bulbs in about one second, while the supply held out -- just pull, twist, and release and you have a fresh bulb in the bowl. BTW, the lower two points are the contacts; the upper is just to locate and stabilize the flash unit against the camera.

    The YMRR code is a "CAMEROSITY" coded number, which translates as 0355, indicating your camera was made in early 1955.

    You can buy Efke 100 film in 127 size from J&C Photo; if the lens is clean and the shutter still works, that camera will make images just as good now as it did 50 years ago.
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

  5. #15

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    I read somewhere on a vintage camera site that the general shutter speed and aperure on box cameras was about 1/40 or so at f11. Back in the distant past I used my first camera (Argus 75) with 620-size Plus-X (ASA 100 then, I think) and got good results on bright days. Later I picked up a No. 3 Model B box Brownie dated around 1920 and got even better besults. It boasted 3 f-stops and used 122 film, then still available in Verichrome Pan. 122 film yielded 8 exposures 3-1/4 x 4-1/4 inches, which made for fine contact prints. Too bad 122 film is no longer available anywhere. I've seen no. 122 contact prints shot with a postcard-size Graflex (3-1/4 x 5-1/4) which are just fabulous. Of course film emulsions contained a lot more silver in those days.

  6. #16
    noseoil's Avatar
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    Just shot my first roll of film with the #2 and used asa 25 Efke. At largest aperture (hole size, not number size) the shot was ok, but slightly thin. I estimated the shutter speed to be between 1/30th and 1/15th based of comparing it to a LF lens. Focal length with slide gave f11, f22, f42. I'm trying FP4 next with this camera and it should be just right. See my most recent upload to the gallery for the shot. tim

  7. #17

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    Coincidently, I recently sold an Argus 75 that I had picked up at an estate sale. I has taken a roll of film with it, and you can get pretty good shots. Surprising really how well some of the simple one aperature/ one shutter speed cameras work. They use a small aperature for good depth of field, and a quick enough shutter that you usually won't move the camera while its open. By the way 122 film IS avaiable from Film for Classics, but it is expensive ($20 for Plus-X Pan).
    Steve Perry
    Steve Perry

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