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  1. #1

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    Found Photographs--Eastern Front Russia WW II

    Found some photographs in an antique shop in Lake Park, GA. USA. All are from Eastern Front, Russia during WW II. If you collect these and are interested in seeing them, I will email them to you (small size of course so they load quickly). Also, they are for sale as well. Let me know if you are interested. Thanks....Matt. No reasonable offer refused. And, as always, APUG will get a donation. Email me at Tourtell@bellsouth.net

  2. #2
    Michel Hardy-Vallée's Avatar
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    Maybe you should consider historical societies or universities before selling them? The Eastern Front was one of the nastiest in WWII and one of the most important so such firsthand documents may be actually useful for the advancement of knowledge.
    Using film since before it was hip.


    "One of the most singular characters of the hyposulphites, is the property their solutions possess of dissolving muriate of silver and retaining it in considerable quantity in permanent solution" — Sir John Frederick William Herschel, "On the Hyposulphurous Acid and its Compounds." The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, Vol. 1 (8 Jan. 1819): 8-29. p. 11

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  3. #3
    kwmullet's Avatar
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    Why not get a Flickr account and upload them so you can share them with us all? (doesn't seem like they'd be appropriate for the galleries here, though)

    -KwM-

  4. #4

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    I know at least one non-profit organization that would be interested in publishing pictures of vehicles from that period: http://www.mafva.org.uk/ . Then there is the Imperial War Museum and the RAC Tank Meuseum at Bovington, and I am sure there are others. But if you are just interested in making money you will have to try the militaria dealers and collectors.
    I feel, therefore I photograph.

  5. #5

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    Real WW 11 photos of U.S. Army in Concentration Camps

    These photos show the U.S. Army in a concentration camp, the photos size are 3 1/2 W X 3 3/8 inches, on the back of the photo paper there is only one name=LEONAR

    What type of camera in WW 11 would take this type of photos, i mean being so small.
    I put this in the Forum for black and white film and paper and chemistry a couple of days ago and no Reply's Yet.

    In the same Forum about picture post cards from the late 40's to early 50's
    The picture's on the post cards are from a Resort in Northern WI.
    On the back in the center there is a name=L.L. Cook Co. Milwaukee WI

    How would of they done this back then.

    Mike.

  6. #6
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    The size you describe was probably an enlargement from 6x6 cm, on either 120 or 620 film. This was a very common size even by the beginning of WWII; 120 film had a framing track printed on the backing for 12 exposures by about 1938 (originally it was 6x9 cm only, and 6x6 went on 117, but that didn't last long at all).

    It's even remotely possible the original negatives were on 35 mm film -- the Zeiss Tenax and Robot cameras both used 35 mm "cine" film, as it was still called in those days, before the war, and both made a 24x24 mm negative (so you'd get 54 frames on a standard roll instead of 36).

    Or they could be cropped from almost any format, naturally...
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

  7. #7

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    The word "Leonar" may refer to Leonar Werke in Germany. They made cameras and lenses, but may have done some photo processing, too.

  8. #8

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    Hi

    A site that you might want to look at is:

    http://www.ww2incolor.com

    There are spectacular color photos of the war here as well as some black and white.

    There are quite a few photos showing up from the old veterns - often after they have passed away - which is really sad because then the story is so much harder to tell.

  9. #9
    mmcclellan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by papisa View Post
    These photos show the U.S. Army in a concentration camp, the photos size are 3 1/2 W X 3 3/8 inches, on the back of the photo paper there is only one name=LEONAR

    What type of camera in WW 11 would take this type of photos, i mean being so small.
    I put this in the Forum for black and white film and paper and chemistry a couple of days ago and no Reply's Yet.

    In the same Forum about picture post cards from the late 40's to early 50's
    The picture's on the post cards are from a Resort in Northern WI.
    On the back in the center there is a name=L.L. Cook Co. Milwaukee WI

    How would of they done this back then.

    Mike.

    If these photos were made by a soldier in a concentration camp, why not donate them to the Holocaust Museum in Washington, DC? They might be able to put them to good use in an exhibit or in their research materials and thus be widely used to educate future generations.
    Michael McClellan
    Documentary Photographer
    Ann Arbor, Michigan
    http://www.MichaelMcClellan.com



 

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