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  1. #21
    Rich Silfver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by srobb_photo
    I had read through some of the older threads and ran across one where some of the folks were talking about using some of their older cameras. Even the old box cameras. What I would like to know is; how do the images come out?
    I have a simply blog site aimed at my classic cameras. Photos of them - and the photos they take: http://silver.blogspot.com
    [FONT=Arial][SIZE=1][COLOR=Navy]Photo Gallery: http://pbase.com/rsilfverberg

    Blog: http://silfver.blogspot.com[/COLOR][/SIZE][/FONT]

  2. #22

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    Nothing wrong with using old cameras!

    They are certainly a great way to get people talking, and not just from the people you'd expect. I've had loads of younger people and even kids fascinated with the cameras, along with the older folks who remember using them. I reckon I learned more Dutch while in Holland using my old camera than in normal day to day life!

    Some of the old cameras are quite good, even now. Some were pretty crappy even when new ;-) I have a "selection" of mainly MF Folders, but also a TLR, MF SLR, 9x12cm, 5x4", plus a few 35mm cameras. I use them all, some more than others

    If I'm taking just one camera with me, even for longer travels, it is always the Iskra (6x6 folder with coupled rangefinder). It is small enough to carry around all day, gives a decent sized negative and has a pretty good lens. I can't say I've ever been left disappointed by the camera itself.

    Some days it's nice to also drag along something else, like a €7 Box Tengor camera.

    Not every picture is about technical perfection.

    So, go on, try using them. You may be pleasantly surprised.

    The image of the statue was taken with the Iskra in Genoa using TriX 400 rated at EI1000 and dev'ed in Diafine. The cabbage trees were shot with the Box Tengor using Efke 25 and Rodinal.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails img364.jpg   cabbage trees.jpg  

  3. #23
    Lachlan Young's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Donald Qualls
    The other direction, I have a Kodak Reflex II, with one of the best front focusing lenses ever made (possibly not up to the best lenses mounted on the Rolleiflex, but it's a lot cheaper than a Rolleiflex, at least now -- usually around $50), and a Kodak Signet 35 (the Ektar lens is in the same class with the ones that Leica used in the 1930s to prove 35 mm was a serious format, not just a "miniature" camera), and a Pentax Spotmatic which, with radioactive 50 mm f/1.4 Super Takumar, is capable of doing justice to the resoution of microfilm -- and is coming up hard on 40 years old.
    I think you've just given me another bout of GAS .Were Pentax or any of the other 'majors' to make the Super Takumar 50mm f1.4 screw mount today they would have to sell them at $1500 each just to cover costs...

    Lachlan (playing weegee in avatar)

  4. #24
    DBP
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lachlan Young
    A bit like the stunned silence that falls over the room when you pull out a Mamiya C330 with potato masher flashgun...
    And that reaction pales in comparison to a bunch of teens and twenty-somethings having their first encounter with a #5 flashbulb going off.

  5. #25
    Jim Noel's Avatar
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    Wggy,

    You have proved once again that it is not the camera, it is the photographer.

    Good job.

    Jim
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

  6. #26
    Lachlan Young's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DBP
    And that reaction pales in comparison to a bunch of teens and twenty-somethings having their first encounter with a #5 flashbulb going off.
    WHUMP!!!!!
    Sadly my 1947 pacemaker speed graphic has X-sync only :rolleyes:

    But it does have provision to mount two flashguns - a graflex and a Heiland one on each side

    Lachlan

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lachlan Young
    WHUMP!!!!!
    Sadly my 1947 pacemaker speed graphic has X-sync only :rolleyes:

    But it does have provision to mount two flashguns - a graflex and a Heiland one on each side

    Lachlan
    Lachlan, your Pacemaker Speed's focal plane shutter synchronizes with FP-class bulbs. The camera has a bipost connector on the right side next to the shutter selector slide. That connects to the FPS. Go to www.graflex.org to learn more.

    What shutter is your lens in?

    Good luck, have fun,

    Dan

  8. #28
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lachlan Young
    Were Pentax or any of the other 'majors' to make the Super Takumar 50mm f1.4 screw mount today they would have to sell them at $1500 each just to cover costs.
    No way it could even be produced these days -- thorium glass is a thing of the past, and while there are "better" glasses that aren't radioactive, they're even more expensive than thorium glass was in the 1960s. However, you're probably right about the pricing of a comparable lens, given what's being asked for the current crop of "designer" lenses for the few remaining new-manufacture film bodies. IIRC, I paid about $100 for my Spotmatic, back in 1981, including that Super Takumar.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lachlan Young
    Sadly my 1947 pacemaker speed graphic has X-sync only :rolleyes:

    But it does have provision to mount two flashguns - a graflex and a Heiland one on each side
    If you have either of those flashguns, check if they have an on-flash contact. If so, they're designed for use with non-synch shutters using a "synchronizer" -- a solenoid device that attaches to the lens board and fires the shutter on command from the flash. You mount the bulb, focus, cock the shutter, pull the dark slide, and when you press the button on the flash the same pulse of current that fires the bulb fires the shutter -- automatically inserting the required 20 ms delay to let the bulb ignite and come up to peak brightness before the shutter fully opens. This method worked with 1920s vintage dial-set Compur shutters, and it'll work with any more modern shutter that has a release lever that can be hooked to the synchronizer.

    Or, as the other poster suggested, you can use FP bulbs, but they're both rarer (hence more expensive and harder to find) and EVEN BRIGHTER -- similar light levels to a #5 or #11, but lasting 150 ms or so, for a 1/8 second focal plane shutter travel time (regardless of slit setting), instead of 30 ms.
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

  9. #29
    DBP
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lachlan Young
    WHUMP!!!!!
    Sadly my 1947 pacemaker speed graphic has X-sync only :rolleyes:

    But it does have provision to mount two flashguns - a graflex and a Heiland one on each side

    Lachlan
    My 1944 Anny is x-synch too. But I just acquired a 90mm for it which is both X and M. Might have to recalibrate the rangefinder for it, then shoot with two #11s. Hope DHS doesn't come after me for that.

  10. #30

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    I love my old cameras but don't have the time to do them justise.
    Look at my subscribers gallery, (Walt), for the street scene with the tall buildings and people walking. This was taken with a 127 size film (J&C has this and other old films) 12 exposures to a roll. Neg size 1-5/8 square. The camera is from the mid 50s and has a built in flash using M-2 size bulbs. This scan is from a 8x8 Silver print. I don't think it would make an 11x14 but could be a little larger then. shown. Duraflex cameras, popular in the late 50 & 60s came in serveral models. some with limited adjustable lenses, some not. Uses 620 film, available form J&C. If you do use your oldies be sure you can process the film. B&W processing is out of site. Walt Sharp

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