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  1. #1

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    Help identifying a "Black Box"

    Howdy: I picked this up in a box of old cameras I bought at a garage sale recently (my home is decorated in "old camera" motif) and haven't a clue what the beast is. I can't get it open and the only writing anywhere on the exterior is on the back and reads: "Use Film No. 130." I Googled that film and found that it was a Kodak "non-curling" film that produced negatives of a size to give my RB67 an inferiority complex. The shutter is interesting, too. It's mounted in front of the lens and is actuated by each throw of the lever. If you take the first picture by pushing it down, you take the next picture by pushing it up. Anyone have any idea what this thing is? Thanks, Doug.
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  2. #2
    Markok765's Avatar
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    Could be a kodak brownie
    Marko Kovacevic
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  3. #3

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    Marko, ol' buddy, do you hover over the keyboard, waiting? Note my post time: 03:36 PM. Your post time: 03:37 PM. Actually, I hadn't discounted Kodak as the possible origin of this beast. However, I have never known Kodak to be reticent about plastering its marque on anything it produced. And there were bunches of different "Brownies." I guess we'll have to wait for input from someone as much older than me than I am of you. No, wait a minute...anybody fitting that bill would be of GREAT interest to science...

    Smiles, Doug

  4. #4

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    Evening Doug.
    Goggle BoxCameras.com

    Lots of ole' cameras and information.

    Mike

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Knutsen
    Howdy: I picked this up in a box of old cameras I bought at a garage sale recently (my home is decorated in "old camera" motif) and haven't a clue what the beast is. I can't get it open and the only writing anywhere on the exterior is on the back and reads: "Use Film No. 130." I Googled that film and found that it was a Kodak "non-curling" film that produced negatives of a size to give my RB67 an inferiority complex. The shutter is interesting, too. It's mounted in front of the lens and is actuated by each throw of the lever. If you take the first picture by pushing it down, you take the next picture by pushing it up. Anyone have any idea what this thing is? Thanks, Doug.
    I have a camera exactly like this one. I'm not sure but it may be a 616 roll film format.
    Don Bryant

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Knutsen
    Marko, ol' buddy, do you hover over the keyboard, waiting? Note my post time: 03:36 PM. Your post time: 03:37 PM. Actually, I hadn't discounted Kodak as the possible origin of this beast. However, I have never known Kodak to be reticent about plastering its marque on anything it produced. And there were bunches of different "Brownies." I guess we'll have to wait for input from someone as much older than me than I am of you. No, wait a minute...anybody fitting that bill would be of GREAT interest to science...

    Smiles, Doug
    I beleive it is a Kodak model but not a brownie.
    Don Bryant

  7. #7
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    Doug,

    I have a camera very similar to the one that you posted. When I opened the camera, by taking the lens and front of the camera apart, it says on the right side of the removed insert with the lens- No. 2A Brownie Camera Model B.
    Richard A. Nelridge
    http://www.nelridge.com

  8. #8

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    First of all, give Marko a cigar - well, a bubble gum cigar, if they still make them. The camera is, indeed, a "Brownie." Mike, I can't thank you enough for turning me on to that site - I'm going to have alot of fun there. I got the camera narrowed down to several similar ones on that web site but none of them matched up perfectly, smaller film sizes, generally, and the camera that matched the closest was the Kodak Hawk-eye No. 2A, Model C. I decided to have another go at getting this camera opened and remembered that on many of the more "modern" 35mm cameras, you pulled the film re-wind crank up to open the back. I tried it with this one, it came up (not easily) and the camera came apart smoothly. Imprinted on the inside is "No. 2-C Brownie, Model A", with patent dates in 1916. This camera looks like it could take pictures if film could be found for it. An observation: on these older cameras, Kodak's nomenclature is more complicated than the cameras themselves!

    Thanks for the help!

    Doug

  9. #9

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    First of all, give Marko a cigar....well, a bubble gum cigar, if they still make them. The camera is, indeed, a Brownie. Mike, I can't thank you enough for turning me on to that web site - I'm going to hava a lot of fun there. I narrowed the possibilities down to a couple of different cameras but there were some differences, most notably the film size. I decided to have another go at getting the camera apart and remembered that on many "modern" 35mm cameras, you pull the the film re-wind crank up to open the back. I tried with this and the crank came up (not easily) after which the camera slipped apart. Imprinted on the inside is "No. 2-C, Model A" with patent dates in 1916.
    You weren't too far off, Richard. Kodak's nomenclature is more complicated than these cameras!

    Thanks again,

    Doug

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    Your welcome
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