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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing
    The most important advantage of it, however, was that in order to make it work, a lot of work was done to maximize film resolution, and to minimize grain. We have all benefited from that work.

    Yes, this was one of the first films to use the most advanced Kodak technology in color films. It was then applied to the other size films, both professional and consumer and let to a big improvement in grain and sharpness.

    And, the batteries were a problem, IIRC.

    PE

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing
    The up side of the disk film was that it didn't suffer from the problems with "complexity" inherent with 35mm (some customers just couldn't handle that loading and rewinding process). It also didn't have the film flatness problems that 126 and to a certain extent 110 suffered from.
    Was simplicity the only upside of the Disc film? I never understood what plus-value the customer would get with those, compared to Instamatic. For snapshots, film flatness is an afterthought at best. Or maybe it was just a silly attempt at building a better mousetrap. They could have improved Instamatic cartridges instead.
    Using film since before it was hip.


    "One of the most singular characters of the hyposulphites, is the property their solutions possess of dissolving muriate of silver and retaining it in considerable quantity in permanent solution" — Sir John Frederick William Herschel, "On the Hyposulphurous Acid and its Compounds." The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, Vol. 1 (8 Jan. 1819): 8-29. p. 11

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  3. #23
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    Kodak wanted to market a pocket sized camera. That was the point of the CEO pulling it out of his shirt pocket in the first public demo to Kodak workers. It was to be a major selling point, and the film format was to have nearly 35 mm quality. The film was very good, but did not achieve that latter goal. The results were very poor IMHO, but my kids loved their cameras.

  4. #24

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    Disc cameras. My first professional shooting job was to photograph Kodak disc cameras. I worked for a production company right next to the State St. office in Rochester, NY. I thought they were pretty cool looking, and at that time (1983) they were gaining popularity in the retail market. A lot of my family member had one. I was using a Canon F1 by that time.
    Don Sigl
    www.drs-fineartphoto.com

  5. #25

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    As a "plate of shrimp" sort of comment (that's a Repo Man reference, if you don't get it), I dropped into my local Salvation Army today to see if they had any interesting bargain cameras (they didn't). They did have a single box of disc film, but no camera to go with it. I didn't check the expiration date or price.

  6. #26
    Michel Hardy-Vallée's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer
    Kodak wanted to market a pocket sized camera. That was the point of the CEO pulling it out of his shirt pocket in the first public demo to Kodak workers. It was to be a major selling point, and the film format was to have nearly 35 mm quality. The film was very good, but did not achieve that latter goal. The results were very poor IMHO, but my kids loved their cameras.
    Oh, but wasn't that something they offered a long time ago?
    http://www.cosmonet.org/camera/vestan_e.htm


    Using film since before it was hip.


    "One of the most singular characters of the hyposulphites, is the property their solutions possess of dissolving muriate of silver and retaining it in considerable quantity in permanent solution" — Sir John Frederick William Herschel, "On the Hyposulphurous Acid and its Compounds." The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, Vol. 1 (8 Jan. 1819): 8-29. p. 11

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  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by mhv
    Oh, but wasn't that something they offered a long time ago?
    http://www.cosmonet.org/camera/vestan_e.htm


    Look at the post by Don Sigl. It was about 1983 and I had just wrapped up putting similar technology into Kodacolor Gold 400.

    PE

  8. #28
    DKT
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    I worked in a lab in the 80s--processed a lot of film & prints in a couple of noritsu machines. the film processor was a leader card type machine, but for disk film, it had this little door on the side, that had a light trap of sorts. you took the disk and loaded it on this hanger type thing and loaded that into the machine....I remember one particularly busy day, running around the lab trying to do too many things at one time....I burned some customer's film right good by forgetting to shut the disk lightrap door....it's a painful (bad customer service experience) memory. the noritsu printer also had this little carousel tray of sorts to hold the disk negs and there was a flip down magnifier as well. I saw more 110, 126 etc. than disk film though, to be honest, which is probably why I left that door open by mistake.

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald Koch
    Dogs also like TV remote controls because, I believe, they are crunchy. I've often thought that they should make these things out of plastic that tastes bad. Maybe then the dogs wouldn't eat them.

    yeah, our dog ate everthing he could - books, food, watches, cameras ... but he also taught the neighbor's dog to drag trash onto his own lawn, now THAT was funny
    im empty, good luck

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by mhv
    Oh, but wasn't that something they offered a long time ago?
    http://www.cosmonet.org/camera/vestan_e.htm


    Sorry Mike. I should have followed up by saying that the disk cameras did not fold up, and they were smaller (I think) than the VPK folded with a better lens (and that too is a matter of opinion).

    I don't remember the film size of the VPK though.

    PE

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