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  1. #1

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    Kodak Disc film cameras

    I recently found a Kodak Disc film camera. i had no idea what it was - I've never even heard of disc film... only sheets and rolls. I found a little bit of information on it but not much. Does anyone know anything about this kind of camera? Are there any collectors of this sort out there? Is this film still produced/ are enlargements made like from other standard film types?

    thank you

  2. #2
    donbga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DirkDynamo
    I recently found a Kodak Disc film camera. i had no idea what it was - I've never even heard of disc film... only sheets and rolls. I found a little bit of information on it but not much. Does anyone know anything about this kind of camera? Are there any collectors of this sort out there? Is this film still produced/ are enlargements made like from other standard film types?

    thank you
    Disk film is no longer produced.
    Don Bryant

  3. #3
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    Ahhh - disk cameras.

    That was one of Kodak's "Eureka moments", when they introduced a strange new product that was supposed to be the next big thing. (kind of like Instamatic of APS). They used disks of film in a sealed cartridge with a sliding dark slide that the camera pulled back during exposure.

    The quality was quite poor, as the frame was about the same size as with 110. The film is no longer produced and there's no easy way to make it.

    You can process the film yourself if you do C-41, as that was all that was ever produced. Very few labs still process it. C-22 in the UK does it still, as does Rocky Mountain photo, but it's really expensive. As to prints, they both do it as well. It's about $30 once you account for shipping and all.

    I'm not aware of any collectors of these cameras. They weren't really that great (IMHO).

    I had one, and it was nice and compact for point and shoot, but ...

    I can scan a print or two if you'd like to see how they look.

  4. #4
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    I was present at a meeting when the then president of EK introduced it by taking one out of his shirt pocket and waving it around. I bought one for each of our kids and they loved them, as they were so small, but I thought that the pictures were very unsharp and grainy.

    I remember how secret it was at first. No one saw anything related to it. Then, when I got on the 'inside' of one of those secret projects, I was given a special brown gate pass. I waved it at the guard and my briefcase could not be searched so as to preserve the secret of the camera or film I was carrying in and out for testing at home.

    PE

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by DirkDynamo
    I recently found a Kodak Disc film camera. i had no idea what it was - I've never even heard of disc film... only sheets and rolls. I found a little bit of information on it but not much. Does anyone know anything about this kind of camera? Are there any collectors of this sort out there? Is this film still produced/ are enlargements made like from other standard film types?

    thank you
    Awe disk film, my first camera (around 1985) was a disk camera. Oh the memories. Though the format kind of sucked (very small). it is an interesting side note... I think it only had 15 exposures per disk and was pretty expensive. then again when your 6 every thing is expensive.

    Dave M
    I don't know where I'm going, but I'm on my way.
    Carl Sandburg

  6. #6

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    does anyone know how much they cost new?

    the film must have been expensive- i doubt any film at all's been run through this camera here. i guess this is one of those instances of history people try to gloss over - it is relatively insignificant to photography today, a failed product launch- but its really interesting to see what big companies thought the consumer would buy back then.

  7. #7
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    Actually, quite a few cameras and a lot of film were sold. Unfortunately, it was short lived. They have little value today. Keep it 100 years or so, and it will be worth something.

    PE

  8. #8
    DBP
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    Actually, disc film is the smallest film format to see wide use, at 8.2x10.6 mm. Even Minox is 8x11. 110 is 2.5 times bigger at 13x17, yet the cameras are often smaller (and better). Frankly, I thought disc cameras were a bad idea when introduced and nothing has ever caused me to rethink that. Even the guys who collect subminiature cameras have little good to say http://www.subclub.org/shop/disc.htm. And if you ever put two 15 exposure discs next to a 36 exposure Minox cartridge, the idea really looks silly - talk about wasted space!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by htmlguru4242
    I'm not aware of any collectors of these cameras. They weren't really that great (IMHO).
    I remember the cameras were criticized for having batteries that couldn't be replaced. They were lithium cells soldered down to the electronic board. Kodak told people this was no big deal, because they would last 5 - 10 years. There were of course a number of complaints from people who had empty batteries after like half a year or so of moderate use. Kodak had to replace their cameras... I think only the top of the line models had replaceable batteries.

    On a side note, lithium batteries were a rather new introduction to consumer electronics back then.
    If you're not taking your camera...there's no reason to travel. --APUG member bgilwee

  10. #10

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    if you have an irish setter, they love to eat disk cameras.
    someone in my family got one for xmas way back when,
    and the irish setter ate it "just out of the box"

    oh there a sub mini forums out there like http://www.subclub.org/
    they might be able to give you a lead on people who collect that sort of thing.

    good luck!
    john

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