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  1. #11
    Nev
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    oh right I see on the lens now. Doh.

  2. #12
    Ole
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    Here's a nice one, although the asking price is insane: http://cgi.ebay.com/Zeiss-Super-Ikon...3A1%7C294%3A50

    The f:3.5 Tessar is much more common than the f:2.8.
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  3. #13

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    Specifically in the field of CHEAP MF folders with a BIG lens, one thing to look for is cameras with a Schneider Radionar lens, which commonly came as an f2.9 for 35 mm and 6x6. This was a triplet lens (3 elements) which had the typical performance of this type, quite good contrast in coated form, central sharpness quite good even at full aperture, edge definition at full aperture indifferent and never matching center even at small apertures. But if you want something cheap and usable, go for it!

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nev View Post
    I looked and found a folder with a trioplan. This look ok? Worth what they are asking?
    TRIOPLAN FOLDER
    Its a VARIO... ?
    there are a few traps for new players Nev...that seller doesnt know what he has so he has just listed it as Vario, however Vario is the name of the shutter, not the name of the camera or lens. The old Varios are very reliable but very basic shutters.

    as you found out, a lens type e.g. Trioplan, was made at different speeds/aperatures depending on year and the camera it was fitted to. after a while it gets easy to recognise them straight away, until then you have to read everything written on the camera

    Also that camera isnt a 120 folder either, so you would of had a suprise trying to load it with film. it takes 116 film (pretty hard to get), which is wider than commonly available 120 film...so that camera takes a 6.5x11cm or 2.5x4.25 inch picture with a 120mm lens.

    from what you said you will likely be after a 6x6 with a 75mm-80mm lens or a 6x9 with a 105mm lens.

    as mentioned earlier the faster lens are usualy found on the higher end cameras of the time so they will be more exspensive than cameras that look like the one you listed.

    the 3 element triplets lenses such as the Trioplan, Trinar, Cassar, Radionar etc will be (should be) cheaper than the 4 element Scopar, Tessar, xenar, Solinar etc and the 5 element 2.8 Xenar and Heliar lenses found on folding cameras

    best of luck in your hunt

  5. #15

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    Nev,

    I took a look at my collection of old folders yesterday. Most are 620 format (or something even more obscure). But, I do have a couple that are 120. If you're interested, I have two Ihagee Auto-Ultrix cameras. Off the top of my head, I don't remember which shutter or lens they have but I could look tonight - I'm guessing the Ihagee lens in Zenith shutter. Both are in excellent condition physically - I think the lenses/shutters are in good shape but I can verify that too.

    Dan

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Anastigmatic View Post
    the 3 element triplets lenses such as the Trioplan, Trinar, Cassar, Radionar etc will be (should be) cheaper than the 4 element Scopar, Tessar, xenar, Solinar etc and the 5 element 2.8 Xenar and Heliar lenses found on folding cameras
    Is the last "Xenar" a typo for "Xenotar"? (Xenars were Schneider's Tessar clones, Xenotars their 5-element lenses comparable to the Zeiss Planar or Voigtlaender Heliar.)

    There are lots of folders out there with 4-element lenses, but not a heck of a lot with 5-element. But the majority of the eBay folders floating around out there seem to have triplets---some of which are quite good lenses, though they need to be used with an understanding of their limitations. (They tend to vignette and to get soft or downright blurry off-centre, especially at mid- to wide apertures. With a modicum of caution and luck, the results can be quite nice aesthetically.)

    The Lens Collector's Vade Mecum (there are downloadable versions around) is an invaluable resource for folder-shopping; it allows you to look up, fairly easily, the lens on the camera you're looking at, and discover "oh, the Mumbletar is a Tessar clone made by Yoyodyne", or whatever. If you get to where you think of the Vade Mecum as beach reading, you're doomed. :-)

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

  7. #17
    Ole
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    "Xenar" has meant a lot of things throught the years, including (but not limited to) Tessars, triplets, reverse tessars, and "planaroids".
    This is not very well covered by the Vade Mecum - it's rather weak on pre-WWII German lenses.
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  8. #18
    Nev
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    I actually like a bit of blur and vignette around the edges sometimes. I kind of get that from my Holga.
    You said that a what lens does that? Tri Element? Not sure what these mean...

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nev View Post
    Tri Element? Not sure what these mean...
    A triplet is a lens consisting of 3 separate lens cells or elements. Very often they'll have names with tri in them such as Triotar.

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ole View Post
    "Xenar" has meant a lot of things throught the years, including (but not limited to) Tessars, triplets, reverse tessars, and "planaroids".
    I did not know this---thanks for the ongoing education! I imagine one could score a pretty good deal on a "planaroid" lens by finding a Xenar of the right type being sold by someone who assumed it was a Tessar type. Do you know how to tell which Xenars are which?

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

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