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  1. #11
    Andy38's Avatar
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    Hello , it may be 117 format : same diameter center shaft and same center hole as 120 , but smaller edges ; these are a little smaller than 620 .
    Only six photographs when used for example with first Original Rolleiflex .
    Last edited by Andy38; 09-21-2009 at 03:52 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #12

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    Just checked an old unused Agfa 120 B&W film in its original box which I have amongst my collectables, it's a wooden-centre spool, 120 size, expiry 1963. Normal 8, 12, or 16 exposure.

  3. #13
    IloveTLRs's Avatar
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    I got a Zeiss Nettar some time last year and it had a wooden spool in it. The camera was b0rked though, so I sent it back, spool and all
    Those who know, shoot film

  4. #14

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    I like to play around with old Graflex SLRs. There were rollfilm backs for these in sizes to match these cameras. For instance, a 2 1/4 x 3 1/4 camera would have taken Type 50 film. My 3 1/4 x 4 1/4 Graflex takes Type 51 film. It is interesting to note that the inside of the back is labeled:

    4 1/4 x 3 1/4
    GRAFLEX ROLL HOLDER
    1922 MODEL
    TAKES
    No 51 EASTMAN GRAFLEX FILM

    There is a patent date of June 20, 1915. There are two empty film rolls inside with wooden cores and metal ends. I believe that this type of film was discontinued in the 1940's.
    Dave

  5. #15
    Brac's Avatar
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    I think the point of the 620 film size, and its larger brother 616, was to use slimmer spools so that the cameras could be made a bit slimmer. As part of this, the spools were made of metal from the outset (back in the early 1930's). I have never seen or heard of a 620 spool with a wooden core.

    For decades 120 spools had metal ends and wooden cores but from around the 50's onwards most manufacturers were using all metal spools. I accept that Agfa apparently was an exception. I think they must have changed in the early 60's as the Agfa spools I've seen from around then were metal (they had their name engraved in the ends). Later everyone seems to have changed to all plastic spools for 120.

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