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  1. #11
    tjaded's Avatar
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    I have a box of un-opened Kodachrome 4x5....so torturous!!

    http://www.mattosbornephotography.co...rome%204x5.jpg
    --------------------
    "Everytime I find a film or paper that I like, they discontinue it." -Paul Strand

    www.glasskeyphoto.com

  2. #12
    Ektagraphic's Avatar
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    He may already have this stuff but I bet PKM-25 (Dan Bayer) would love to have hold of the roll and the sheets.
    Helping to save analog photography one exposure at a time

  3. #13
    Time Freeze's Avatar
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    I have a unpened box of 12 Roebuck (I guess before he met Sears ) 3 1/4 x 5 1/2 orthochromatic dry plates. The box is marked extra fast but there isn't any speed on the box; no expiration date either.

    John
    www.TimeFreezePhotos.com

    "Accept the fact that some days you are the pigeon and some days you are the statue"

  4. #14
    holmburgers's Avatar
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    wow, 4x5 kodachrome. cream dream.... hahaha

  5. #15
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    A Zeiss Contax camera my father gave me when I was a teenager he brought back from WW11 still had some Zeiss Ikon film in it, as far as I remember, the camera is pre war I don't know when Zeiss stopped marketing this film, but certainly in the 1930s.
    Last edited by benjiboy; 02-20-2010 at 02:25 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Ben

  6. #16
    jcorll's Avatar
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    My grandfather just recently gave me his Kodak Retina II from the WWII. He also gave me his camera bag and inside it is a roll of exposed 35mm Ansco color film in its aluminum/steel canister. My guess is that the film is from the 50's or maybe 60's. I am in a photography class and really want to develop it. Anybody know what the developer would be? Would it just be regular C-41?
    My weapons consist of 11 cameras. And counting... Be afraid.

    We are the makers of music, The dreamers of dreams.

  7. #17

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    I have just shot a few half-plate sheets of Kodak Ortho-X from I believe 1938. Luckily it is B&W and works fine. Not quite sure if it is giving the full ASA125 though. I have a second un-opened box from the same batch that I shall store for a few more years....

    Evan

  8. #18
    Dan Henderson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by holmburgers View Post
    Really?! I always wondered what safety-film meant. That makes sense I guess. You know, the bikes we take for common today were once known as safety bikes, compared to the giant front wheeled 'penny-farthings' of the day.

    cheers!
    My understanding is that flammable nitrate-base film was replaced with a more stable acetate base, which was safer, and marketed as "safety film." I have never known just how flammable it was, whether it would spontaneously ignite perhaps after some time to oxidize in air, or if the heat of a movie projector would ignite it, or what.
    Dan


    web site: Dan Henderson, Photographer.com

    blog: https://danhendersonphotographer.wordpress.com/

    I am not anti-digital. I am pro-film.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Henderson View Post
    My understanding is that flammable nitrate-base film was replaced with a more stable acetate base, which was safer, and marketed as "safety film." I have never known just how flammable it was, whether it would spontaneously ignite perhaps after some time to oxidize in air, or if the heat of a movie projector would ignite it, or what.
    Dan
    That's correct....the nitrate film is VERY inflammable and needs no oxygen to continue burning once lit. It also decays readily and becomes very unstable. Despite precautions, there were some horrific accidents in the early days of movie theatres.

    As regards the Kodachrome found by the OP, there is no chance of it now being processed or even being usable. But it's very collectable, and, if the box, etc., is in good condition, it's really a museum-quality item.

  10. #20
    bdilgard's Avatar
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    In a lot of 620 film that I purchased for the spools I found a box of Ektachrome develop before Apr, 1949. One end is torn off but there is a sealed roll inside. Whether it is the original I don't know. Interesting to me the box says "Processing directions packed in Kodak EKtachrome Processing Kit" and on another side "This film will not be processed by Eastman Kodak Company".
    Turning negative into positive since 1975

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