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  1. #1
    Andy38's Avatar
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    The first Rolleiflex, the Original

    They are four.
    They were born between 1929 and 1932.
    They are not easy to use : if you try to put a 120 rollfilm in it, you can't close the back ! Screen is dark; and, if you don't pay attention, you don't remember if you have taken the picture : you advance the film; or not...
    But these Original's are so lovely !

    Number 1, the 611, the older with Tessar f4,5 taking lens, and number 2, the 612 (f3,8), have not a hinged back : some light may pass through...
    Number 3 (613, f,4,5) and number 4 (614, f3,8) have a hinged back.

    If you find one and like it, then you'll love TLR's !
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 4_Original.jpg  

  2. #2
    Ektagraphic's Avatar
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    Built to last....a few lifetimes
    Are the lenses coated in these?
    Helping to save analog photography one exposure at a time

  3. #3
    Andy38's Avatar
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    No, lenses are not coated; these have no modifications.

  4. #4

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    I've got a late 30ies Rolleicord II (Triotar 3,5) and a "fake TLR" Voigtländer Brillant "Landschaft-Gruppe-Portrait" (Landscape-Group-Portrait) from the year 1933 which my Grandma got as a birthday present when she was twelve.

    And yes, I love them both, it's great to take pictures with them, I even used the Cord for my holiday pictures last year and they were lovely - although most of them were in colour (Kodak Portra 160 NC is a nice film for these cameras).

    Best regards from Germany!

  5. #5

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    I love my Rolleiflex but those are awesome!

    Jeff

  6. #6

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    I have only one "Original" in my collection, and I love it.

  7. #7
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    Didn't the first Rolleis use 117 film? If so, 120 wouldn't fit. You're right, they are really nice. Always the best quality. I have a book about the history of Franke & Heidecke (sp?), but not where I can find it. It's really interesting.
    My 1949 model has a coated Schneider taking lens and an uncoated viewing lens. Takes really sharp photos even though this isn't supposed to be the best lens. I love using it.
    Bruce

    Moma don't take my Kodachrome away!
    Oops, Kodak just did!
    For all practical purposes, they've taken Kodak away.


    BruceCSdunekPhotography.zenfolio.com

  8. #8
    Andy38's Avatar
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    Yes, Original's used 117 film and too big 120 spool doesn't fit.
    But they often were modified to use 620, which fits but with a smallest hole : the winding key to insert the film spool was changed; and some could use 117 and 620 :
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Original_3.jpg  

  9. #9
    JPD
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    I have film in my near mint Original Rolleiflex 3,8. I re-spooled the film on a 620-spool (it fits in the bottom chamber), and use a 117 as the take-up spool. I'll have to unload the film in the darkroom.

    The 117-spool is like a mix between 120 and 620. The wooden spool diameter and keyholes are like in a 120, but the flanges have a smaller diameter just like a 620.

    On a 117-roll you could take six 6x6 exposures. It was called "B1" or "6x6-film" in Germany. 120-film was called "B2" or "6x9-film".

    120-film didn't have the markings for 6x6 back then, so when the first Rolleiflex Standard came on the market in 1932 you lined up the 6x9-marking for the first frame in the red window on the bottom of the camera, and then engaged the mechanical counter. The first batch of the Standard also had a red window on the back to use with 117-film.
    J. Patric Dahlén

  10. #10
    JPD
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    Andy, do you have an original Rolleiflex with a later added mechanical counter?
    J. Patric Dahlén

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