Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,920   Posts: 1,521,999   Online: 1026
      
Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Wood and Brass

  1. #1
    Photographica's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Indiana
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    109

    Wood and Brass

    I was excited to find the Antiques and Collecting forum.
    Does anyone on APUG have any interest in Wood and Brass cameras?

    Here is one that I'm trying to identify. I've come close but I have not been able to find verification (catalog pics, article, other reference). I thought it was Scovill but I'm not sure.

    Bill


  2. #2

    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Montreal,QC
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    334
    Images
    18
    I love antique cameras. I recently sold my 8x10 ROC Carlton from 1892 cause i needed instant cash for rent

    have you checked www.historiccamera.com ? maybe you can find something there..

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Just north of the Inferno
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    750
    Images
    27
    How does that thing work? I mean the CoC must be well....

    Confusing....
    Official Photo.net Villain
    ----------------------
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]DaVinci never wrote an artist's statement...[/FONT]

  4. #4
    fingel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    298
    Images
    4
    That looks like an interesting camera. Like it can take 4 images at once like those little cheap plastic cameras you can buy to analyze your golf swing but much bigger.

    I found another interesting camera on ebay, I am tempted to bid on it myself but it looks like a big heavy monster. It says it is an old tri-color camera. I guess if anyone is making tricolor gum prints this would be a nice timesaver.

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...sPageName=WDVW
    Scott Stadler

  5. #5
    Joe Lipka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Cary, North Carolina
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    808
    Looks like a camera for making carte de visites. They were quite the rage in the late nineteenth century. A calling card with the visitor's portrait. When you went visiting you dropped one off at your host's house. Usually kept in albums.
    Two New Projects! Light on China - 07/13/2014

    www.joelipkaphoto.com

    250+ posts and still blogging! "Postcards from the Creative Journey"

    http://blog.joelipkaphoto.com/

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Southern Cal
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    485
    Images
    14
    Cool forum. I like old wood and brass cameras too, along with other old things that still work or are interesting.

  7. #7
    Photographica's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Indiana
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    109

    Penny Picture Camera

    There were a few models called "Penny Picture" and there are some collectors generically calling these type cameras penny picture cameras.

    Here is a back view of the camera. As you can see the back is designed to shift vertical and horizontal. Using a single lens. this allows the photographer to take 6, 8, 12, or 24 separate pictures on the same 5"x7" plate. The 4-tube lens set on front will give you four identical pictures on a single plate.



  8. #8

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    1,640
    Images
    5
    Good Morning,

    Back in the 1970's, the local portrait/studio photographer would come to our high school each fall to do the student pictures. I don't know the specific kind of camera he used, but I do know that he used 5 x 7 film and a shifting back similar to that shown in Photographica's last post. We had an enrollment of around 500-550 students at the time, so he would have needed a couple of dozen sheets (assuming 24 shots per sheet) for the whole job. He probably used hangers in dip and dunk tanks for the processing (maybe a dozen at a time) so the method he used is actually a rather efficient way to do the job. I just don't know how he had the concentration to avoid blanks and double-exposures!

    Konical

  9. #9
    Photographica's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Indiana
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    109
    Quote Originally Posted by Konical
    Good Morning,

    I just don't know how he had the concentration to avoid blanks and double-exposures!

    Konical
    Right! I too am amazed at the their ability to effectively use these muti-imaging systems. From what I have read, they were quite efficient.

    Your 1970's account is the latest I have heard of anyone using multi-exposure backs. I have a few studio cameras with sliding backs for multiple exposures on 5x7 and 8x10 film -- these cameras are from the 1920's and 30's. I had a back for my Deardorff that supported at least two exposures on 5x7. You're the first of anyone I've talked to who has accounted any real use of these backs though.
    Bill

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Shooter
    Digital Negs
    Posts
    1

    My guess would be a Scovill

    Hi,

    I found this thread from the link to my site. Thanks Deniz! I would have bought your ROC too, nice camera. I mainly collect the ROC line.

    Photographica, Thats an awesome camera too! My guess is that it is an Anthony & Scovill "CLIMAX". Scovill & Adams used the white tags above the lens as yours has. It looks very similar to the climax model as shown in this 1906 catalog clipping. Advertised as being capable of making multiple images depending in the lens. It was packaged as a penny picture camea. hope this helps some.
    Regards,
    Tom
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails climax.jpg  



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin