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  1. #21
    tac
    tac is offline

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    I, too, had a massive stroke a while back; my solution was switching to tlr's as Theflyingcamera suggests. Now if I could just walk more than 50 feet, . . . .

    I prefer the Yashica Mat (not the 124 or 124G), for ease of use, and cost.

  2. #22

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    I agree with Cheryl: focus on your breathing. A good strategy is to take a few extra seconds and take two or three deep breaths - before you let out part of that last one and start your shutter squeeze. You will find other tips like this on rifle shooting websites. Once I have the camera set up and the photo framed I try doing things like pressing the shutter in sequence with my pulse.
    I am also enjoying photography while recovering from a brain injury. Although my left brain analytical function is not what it was, I am finding my right brain function greatly enhanced. I find I have much greater awareness of light and form - or maybe I am just taking the time to notice. I have slowed my pace right down these days and live life in my own time. I like to chill out and tune in with my natural body rhythms while taking photos. Life's great

  3. #23
    Strokebloke's Avatar
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    tac, I'm sorry to hear about your stoke. You obviously have it a lot rougher than I do. I can walk a lot more than 50 feet, though I clearly remember the frustration of being able to walk such a short distance. I, like you I'm sure, can also remember when being able to walk 50 feet was a seemingly impossible task & an unobtainable goal. So we've both come a long my friend. (with a long way yet to go, I'm sure - but we'll get there)
    I do get about well now. Slowly, ;-) but well. I'm four & a half years down the line from my stokes and I've made considerable progress.
    I have much to be grateful for. not least being able to explore this new and alien world of photography :-)

    PS: as a young man I rode the Appalachian mountains ona bike.

    Regards,
    Jack

  4. #24
    Strokebloke's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alistair56 View Post
    I like to chill out .......... while taking photos. Life's great
    Good for you alistair
    People I know, who have been traumatised in any life-threatening manner, suddenly begin to appreciate the finer things in life &, all of a sudden, 'living life to the full' takes on a whole new meaning, doesn't it?

    At this rate we'll be able to set a Blue Badge Holders Section

    Regards,
    Jack

  5. #25
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    Hi Jack

    Well I see you made it here from epz and it certainly is the best place to be for film photography. I had kind of guessed there must be a medical history to your username, but hadn't realised all that was involved and kudos to you for getting it together with photography! The one thing that comes to mind is the Gorillapod http://joby.com/products/gorillapod/2 which can either be used freestanding or can be wrapped around anything handy like a tree or a fence, plus they seem to be quite compact for carrying. I haven't used one myself, but maybe it would be worth a try or even a play in the shop?

    Peter (aka Snapper)

  6. #26
    Andy K's Avatar
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    I have a Gorillapod Zoom. Probably one of the handiest devices I've ever used! I have just ordered the latest incarnation, the Gorillapod Focus, which can take up to 5kg, which is more than enough to keep my Bronica steady!


    -----------My Flickr-----------
    Anáil nathrach, ortha bháis is beatha, do chéal déanaimh.

  7. #27
    Strokebloke's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=Peter Black;755129] The one thing that comes to mind is the Gorillapod, which can either be used freestanding or can be wrapped around anything handy like a tree or a fence, plus they seem to be quite compact for carrying.QUOTE]

    Hi Peter. You make me feel quite at home
    My problem is that I'm unstable when I'm totally isolated from anything practical upon which to rest or wrap myself around. Unfortunately, the same is true for the Gorillapod. If I had something I could attach it to, I could attach myself to it instead and save the cost of the Gorillapod.
    I have a tripod, a monopod & a table tripod, which each get used a lot. It's when I'm in an open space where standing, kneeling or sitting unsupported in any manner, is necessary to compose the shot. To compliment all of the valued advice I've received I think I also need to consider how I compose the shots. Maybe if I 'thought-out-of-the-box' I would always be able to find the means to gain stability, which means that I'd be able to benefit from the purchase of a Gorillapod. A bit of lateral thinking required I suspect.

    Many thanks to each & all.
    Your participation and advice is greatly valued.
    Regards,
    Jack

  8. #28
    Strokebloke's Avatar
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    Well, I've done my lateral thinking. Or at least as much as I'm prepared to do. I've been to my local photographic [enthusiasts] shop & looked at a YashicaMat they have for sale for £59. Having handled it and focussed on various items around the shop with it, I can easily understand why TheFlyingCamera & Andy suggested something like this. However, I don't really want to get into another format of camera & film, so I'm going to give that one a miss. What I am inclined towards at the moment is to use my two 35mm film cameras either at home in a studio type set-up, or, where I have the time to set up, prior to taking any shots. For any other circumstances - i.e. "quick get the camera & get a shot of that/this/him/her", or situations where I know that I'm going to be faced with at least some occasions of 'free-standing' shooting, I'll use the Sony a200 D-SLR. I suspect it probably goes against the ethics of this forum to consider using digital; but I own one, & it's a good camera with good lenses & I'm not inclined to let it rot on the shelf for the sake of ethics. Sorry if that offends: I'm merely being practical. The positive side is that I can learn, using Cheryl's breathing-control for instance, to compose shots without shaking like a leaf. Then I'll be able to use film anywhere, in any situation, as well. I do hope that you'll forgive my apparent treachery, but personally I'm much more interested in learning photography than immersing myself if ethical issues. I'm too old for that and anyway, life for me at least, may be much, much too short

    Thank you all for your help, advice & patience.
    As far as I'm concerned, I'm still very much 'with you' and I would like to think that this decision will not result in being ostracized in any manner.

    Kind Regards,
    Jack
    Last edited by Strokebloke; 02-19-2009 at 09:06 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #29
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    All of the suggestions are good, but one has been over looked! It is extremely expensive, very cumbersome, and very high tech .

    Tie a cord to the bottom of the camera (you can use a long screw in the tripod mount hole, being careful not to turn it in so far as to damage the camera, most these days have a "bottom" though) and then step on the cord in the appropriate place and pull it tight. Fast, easy, cheap, so worth a shot. Might make just the difference you are after.

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Strokebloke View Post
    I'm goping to have to look into this VR lens issue :-)
    But first of all I need to be sure that I understand what VR is. I assume it is some sort of IS system, but in the lens rather than in the camera body [as is the Sony IS system] The problem is that I have a whole bagful of Nikon Nikkor lenses & a Tokina and Tamron and Vivitar.
    If The VR system is indisputably the only sure way to solve the problem I'll set aside my present lenses & buy new ones. I must admit that my preconditioned response to the problem, until I raised it here, was to use the lenses I'd got - but be selective about the discipline areas within photography that I engage in. i.e. Portrait-Landscape-Studio. The sort of things that don't require quick and rock-steady reflexes. :-) And in which I can reasonably be expected to use a tripod, with isolated shutter-release.
    Are VR lenses particularly expensive? And are they easily available through normal photographic retail outlets?
    Can I buy good quality second-hand components on eBay?

    J
    I have found Canon's IS lenses(their name for vibration reduction) to be helpful, though far from necessary. I prefer a tripod.

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