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  1. #31
    Strokebloke's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JBrunner View Post
    All of the suggestions are good, but one has been over looked! It is extremely expensive, very cumbersome, and very high tech .

    Tie a cord to the bottom of the camera (you can use a long screw in the tripod mount hole, being careful not to turn it in so far as to damage the camera, most these days have a "bottom" though) and then step on the cord in the appropriate place and pull it tight. Fast, easy, cheap, so worth a shot. Might make just the difference you are after.
    I have GOT to give that a try; even if it's just for the novelty value.
    At the moment I have no idea what you're suggesting it might achieve, but it's obviously something that has worked for you at some point; so it's got to be worth a try. Thank you for the thought.

    I'll come back to you when I've figured out what the cord is supposed to do; & let you know whether it works for me.

    Regards,
    Jack

  2. #32
    JBrunner's Avatar
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    The tension on the cord steadies the camera. While the camera can "float" back and forth, shakes are dramatically dampened. Don't pull so tight that the camera will go flying if the cord slips from your foot or the camera, a moderate tension is enough. Think of it sort of like a monopod in reverse.

  3. #33
    Andy K's Avatar
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    Here's a variation on that:



    -----------My Flickr-----------
    Anáil nathrach, ortha bháis is beatha, do chéal déanaimh.

  4. #34
    Strokebloke's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JBrunner View Post
    The tension on the cord steadies the camera. While the camera can "float" back and forth, shakes are dramatically dampened. Don't pull so tight that the camera will go flying if the cord slips from your foot or the camera, a moderate tension is enough. Think of it sort of like a monopod in reverse.
    Yes. I've tried it. It had got to be something like that. It does work; at least to some extent. My arm is heavy. approx 22lb (a stone & a half or 10kg) [everyone's arm is heavy-but because muscle, sinew & tendon all collaborate to support a healthy arm, no-one notices how heavy their arm is (my leg is twice that weight ]
    Holding it up, in the camera composition position, is what makes it shake. [stress in shoulder muscles which are no longer designed to lift & support]
    However, placing the stressed muscle into a strained situation [lifting against the tension in the cord] does alleviate a proportion of the stress. Hence less shake.
    But it's very tiring.
    Nevertheless it is something else to work at & I'm grateful to you for it. Thank you.
    I must admit I would probably not have thought of it myself.

    Regards,
    Jack

  5. #35
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Sony took over Minolta, so you can use the Sony lenses with older Minolta models. I hope that helps.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  6. #36
    Strokebloke's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    Sony took over Minolta, so you can use the Sony lenses with older Minolta models. I hope that helps.
    The Sony IS system is contained within the body Steve, not the lens. So putting a modern Sony lens onto a 35mm Minolta body wouldn't achieve anything I'm afraid. I presume that what what you were suggesting.

    On a more promising note however I have worked a lot and practiced many of your suggestions over the last couple of weeks. Particularly the breathing control: which alone has certainly not provided the whole answer, but has contributed signnificantly. One thing I have learned is to slow down & relax. I realised that in my inexperienced enthusiasm to get a shot, I was rushing [almost in case the shot got away; which was balmy because most of the shots were landscapes: they're still the same today as they were a fortnight ago :rolleyes:] It suddenly dawned on me that I've never behaved in that manner when I'm setting up a site level or a theodolite. I've always taken my time and got it right.
    So I've slowed down a lot. The consequence is that my confidence has increased because I'm no longer stressed that I'm going to miss the shot. [yes, the landscape one, that's still there now] Because my confidence has increased and I've slowed down, I'm taking better shots, compositionally and in terms of shot-taking technique. Consequently because I'm now a lot less conscious of shaking and a lot less concerned about it, I shake less
    It seems stupidly simple: but it's actually working.
    I still take the monopod out with me: and I use it when necessary or prudent.
    But I don't now feel obliged to use it, or fear that if I have no means of support I will not be able to take a decent photo.
    None of my work is going to win any awards. But I probably still won't be winning awards in twenty years time :rolleyes: so that's no problem. What's great is that I'm enjoying going out with the camera again, instead of almost dreading it; as was the case before.

    Sorry this has been so long-winded, but I appreciate the encouragement and support you each provided when I originally asked for help; so it seems reasonable to appraise you of some of the outcomes, even if they are not yet complete and there is still considerable room for much more progress.
    I guess what I'm saying is: a big thank you, to you all.

  7. #37
    Cheryl Jacobs's Avatar
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    Congratulations! I've always found APUG to be an incredibly friendly and helpful place -- I'm glad you've experienced the same.

    - CJ

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