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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by jhw View Post
    Attachment 48896

    This pic shot in the sleezy-camera-swap-buyer mode, with bright light from behind the lens...
    From the front, it looks hair-thin, but does catch my fingernail...
    It's not in the center... Seems to just be in the coating, not down to the glass...
    We know that lenses with huge pits, marks, spots, shattered portions can still make (albeit, less contrasty) images...

    Test roll shot backlit, front and sidelit went to lab today, back in 2 days... But just wondering if folks think, as I hope, that the only harm this does is to the resale value.
    That's more of a gouge. Far deeper than the coating.

    One of my favorite lenses is a pre WWI 9 1/2" Dagor in a Compound. Got it at a camera show for $40 because it has a 5/16" gouge very near the center of the rear outer glass. I filled the gouge with India ink, and can see no difference ( after 12 years of using it on 8x10) between it and another 9 1/2" of the same vintage in barrel.

  2. #12
    jhw
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    'Gouge' and 'lens' in the same sentence is nausea-inducing, but the ink fix really does seem to come to the rescue. I'll practice some fine lines of application on some old eyeglasses with gouges, wisps and canyons of damage...then, with steady hand, give it a try if tomorrow's prints come out negative. (bad pun). Regardless, this gives me an idea about what to do with the mine-field surface of a 150/2.8 Xenotar picked up from that fellow who bought/sold hundreds of them a few years back on the auction site.

  3. #13
    Richard Sintchak (rich815)'s Avatar
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    I agree with most of what the others say I don't think it'll make much of a difference. I have a Rolleiflex TLR with a Planar lens with many fine scratches on the front, it produces such a beautiful moderate contrast versus my Xenotar Rolleiflex and my other Planar one with no scratches and I often prefer it's images over both of those! Go figure.
    -----------------------

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  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by jhw View Post
    'Gouge' and 'lens' in the same sentence is nausea-inducing, but the ink fix really does seem to come to the rescue. I'll practice some fine lines of application on some old eyeglasses with gouges, wisps and canyons of damage...then, with steady hand, give it a try if tomorrow's prints come out negative. (bad pun). Regardless, this gives me an idea about what to do with the mine-field surface of a 150/2.8 Xenotar picked up from that fellow who bought/sold hundreds of them a few years back on the auction site.
    Just dab some ink into the gouge, then wipe gently at right angles to the gouge with some paper towel stretched across your fingertip. Do it again if it doesn't fill in the gouge the first first time.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by rich815 View Post
    I agree with most of what the others say I don't think it'll make much of a difference. I have a Rolleiflex TLR with a Planar lens with many fine scratches on the front, it produces such a beautiful moderate contrast versus my Xenotar Rolleiflex and my other Planar one with no scratches and I often prefer it's images over both of those! Go figure.
    Based on experience, I'll take a lens with one or two bag gouges over a lens with many fine scratches. It's a lot easier to reduce the contrast of a good lens than to improve the contrast of a trashed lens.

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