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  1. #1

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    Apr 2012
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    Cleaning fungus off mirror

    Hello,
    I have been doing some reading on how to clean a first surface mirror, like that found on a rolleiflex automat. I was wondering if a fungal cream would be fine to use, or if hydrogen peroxide would work? I cannot seem to find many answers to what would be fine to use as far as chemicals. I tried checking into telescope mirror cleaning but It doesnt seem like they suffer from fungified mirrors often.

  2. #2
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    They are front silvered screens so very delicate. A replacement screen is actuall relatively inexpensive and would be the best option, someone sells them on Ebay quite regularly

    If you do try cleaning the screen it has to be done very carefully. I have cleaned a Rolliecord screen successfully but used nothing more than glass cleaner.

    Ian

  3. #3

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    If Im not mistaken replacing the lens would require re-focusing it. Is this something I can read up on and do myself?

    EDIT: it sounds like that replacing is the best otption, so I might as well try cleaning it since I have nothing to lose.

  4. #4

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    I've cleaned 2 or 3, with usable, but not perfect results. With the mirror out of the camera I immerse it in vinegar for a minute or so, then wipe the surface with a VERY soft tissue (toilet paper), rolled up, and applying no pressure whatsoever beyond the weight of the tissue itself. Then repeat the process using demineralised water, removing as much of the liquid as possible, but again with zero pressure.

    The vinegar seems to produce a very, very slight reddish discolouration, but I am fairly sure hydrogen peroxide would be more corrosive. The fungus will have etched the surface wherever it has touched, so the mirror performance won't be any better - you will only have stopped it getting worse. If the fungus is bad, you are really much better off replacing the mirror. I use the mirrors from cheap Polaroids on the 35mm SLRs I've dealt with, but it might not be big enough for a Rolleiflex. I have a note of the dimensions at home, but not with me at present.

    You will also want to treat the mirror platform to make sure there isn't fungus lurking there to reappear in the future!

    Steve.

  5. #5
    Jim Noel's Avatar
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    Listerine is an anti-fungal and cleans glass beautifully w/o leaving any trace.
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

  6. #6
    Eugen Mezei's Avatar
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    Jim, as I have a lens here with fungus: How do you apply Listerine? Just bath the lens elements in it and let it dry? Or wash it afterwards with distilled water?

  7. #7

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    Rollie (or any twin lens camera) lenses have to be replaced in matched pairs as they have to focus exactly the same point as the lens you are viewing with. Clean a fungus'd front surface mirror very carefully by wiping with skin cream and then cleaning thoroughly with denatured alcohol. John



 

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