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  1. #1
    Shinnya's Avatar
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    Lubricating gears on view cameras

    Hi,

    I would like to know what sort of lubricant that I should use for gears on view cameras. Also, where I can get them? Any suggestions would be appreciated. Thank you in advance.

    Warmly,
    tsuyoshi

  2. #2
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    On my Technika I just use a little lith grease. You can get it at a hardware or auto parts store. A small tube or container will last a lifetime.

    You can clean out old grease with naphtha.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  3. #3
    mikepry's Avatar
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    Ronson Lighter Fluid = Naptha
    "EVERY film and paper is good .......... for something"
    Phil Davis

  4. #4
    Loose Gravel's Avatar
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    Sewing machine grease is good. I especially like the teflon grease that the bicycle folks use.
    Watch for Loose Gravel

  5. #5
    gma
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    Silicone grease such as Permatex dielectric tune-up grease lubricant is good. It does not drip and very little is required for gears, threads and other small parts.

  6. #6

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    This year I went on a photographic trip / workshop in Iceland. I guess I don't have to explain that it gets cold there. My metallic Kodak Master 8x10 got quite sticky at those temperatures. I was wandering if pure silicone or even graphite would be a better option.
    I think it has to be a dry lubricant to avoid dirt sticking in to it. Maybe something with teflon?

  7. #7
    Flotsam's Avatar
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    I think that if I had a problem with my 4x5, I might try paraffin first. I used to use it on my bicycle chains. Good lubrication, stays where it's put, doesn't pick up dirt, not greasy.
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  8. #8

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    Well, what kind of gears are these? If they are brass all you need to do is clean them very well, brass does not need a lubricant to work properly. In fact it is worse if you do it, since mostly is gathers more dust and makes it worse.

    If the camera is made of wood, you run the risk of getting the lubricant between the brass or metal gear and the wood, which can cause wood rot.

    I am going to go against the grain here and recommend you do not lubricate, just clean very thoroughly, if necessary with a tooth brush, but leave the lubrication alone.

  9. #9
    dr bob's Avatar
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    I go with Jorge. My experience with various lubricants has been variable but mostly bad. To make your wood parts slip (like the older negative carriers) try rubbing a very little bees wax on a spare carrier and slip it in and out a couple of times. Then wipe it down with a soft lintless cloth or a product like Kem-wipe. It will not migrate into unwanted areas. It lasts a long time and is quite stable.
    I love the smell of fixer in the morning. It smells like...creativity!
    Truly, dr bob.

  10. #10

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    There's a product called Slide-All marketed by Elmer's (as in Elmer's glue...) which consists of microscopic particles of Teflon in an aerosol spray. Once the propellent evaporates, the result is a dry lubricant. Overspray can be a problem, but it wipes up easily as long as it's in an accessible area. I've used it with great success to lubricate Grafmatic holders and occasionally rails on a field camera.
    My Verito page

    Anyone can appreciate a fine print. But it takes a real photographer to appreciate a fine negative.

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