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  1. #1
    ambaker's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
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    Missouri, US
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    Voigtlander Bessa resuscitation

    I picked up a Voigtlander Bessa 6x9 folder, with a Compur-Rapid shutter, and a 10.5cm 3.5 lens.

    Cosmetically the camera is in pretty good shape. The two big problems are the shutter, and that the lens does not seem to want to sit square, to the film plane. It seems to want to tilt upwards a bit.

    The shutter appears to be in major need of a CLA. The question is, does anyone have a decent reference to do this kind of work? I've never taken one of these bad boys apart. Even though I got it for cheap money, I do not want to ruin it. I've worked with plenty of electro mechanical devices that were plenty sensitive, and chock full of small parts, over the years. But I also know that a good reference manual, or other source, can help save some really bad mistakes.

    Thanks!
    -alex

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Apr 2004
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    Montgomery, Il/USA
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    If the lens is parallel to it's mounting plate, it's likely a latch holding the front standard in position. It should be near the brackets near the bed of the camera.

    If you're curious about the shutter, the lens will unscrew from the shutter. CCW, it's standard. There should be a stop sticking out of the lens, that simply unscrews and allows it to be removed.
    The face of the shutter is held on by three screws and simply lifts off, under that is a speed cam that also lifts off. Look at the cam before removing it, you're going to see two or three pins fitting into the openings in the cam. They have to be in those grooves when you put it back together.
    Once the two plates are removed you have access to the entire works.
    Pay close attention to the direction levers move and which side of a post springs are on and you should have no problems.
    Two very important items though.
    You will need a good set of tweezers.
    And more importantly, When a spring pops off it's post, it's moving to another dimension........They don't call 'em hairsprings for nothing.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.



 

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