Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,536   Posts: 1,544,249   Online: 752
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 21
  1. #11
    Andrew Moxom's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Keeping the British end up in Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,870
    Images
    333
    Deardorff had rotating backs in some their larger commercial view or studio cameras. The idea was that you could rotate the film rather than the entire camera to align verticals etc.
    Please check out my website www.amoxomphotography.com and APUG Portfolio .....

  2. #12
    Steve Smith's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Ryde, Isle of Wight
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    8,596
    Images
    122
    You could also use strong magnets to hold the back in place.

    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  3. #13
    Diapositivo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Rome, Italy
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,844
    Pardon my ignorance.
    If your back has a square shape, why don't make it with a slot above, and a slot on the side?
    You don't need rotating the back.
    You would insert the sheet film from above for a portrait shot and from the side for a landscape shot.
    Fixed "guides" would centre the sheet on the lens.
    Considering that the back is square, and the sheet film is rectangular, the guides for portrait orientation would not interfere with landscape orientation and vice versa.
    Am I missing anything? (never used a LF camera).
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
    Stock images at Imagebroker: http://www.imagebroker.com/#/search/ib_fbr

  4. #14
    polyglot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    South Australia
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    3,276
    Images
    12
    Without even a drillpress you're going to struggle building a back whether rotating or not. However...

    The Toyo back design is made of folded metal so would be hard to directly replicate but the idea is not. Consider the back to be a square wooden thing which rests in a square recess on the rear standard of the camera. You can put the back in in any of 4 orientations and it will sit in exactly the right place as long as something is clamping it in. Toyos use sliding metal latches similar to the ones that typically hold a lensboard onto the front standard. Steve's idea of using magnets to retain the back is excellent though, especially if the non-magnet side was constructed from a 1.5mm sheet of mild steel.

    See this photo. While it's the front of the camera, you can see the sliding bit of metal at the top that retains the lensboard - that's how the backs are often clamped in. Think of the back as being like the lensboard - square thing in square hole and clamped in somehow, though of course the back protrudes from its "hole" a lot further so that you can get film holders in. That's all you need to do.

  5. #15
    Ian Grant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    West Midlands, UK, and Turkey
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,270
    Images
    148
    Here's a Half plate back, before a new screen was installed. It ists on two brabkets at the bottom then gets held in place by two brackets that swing in/out of place at the top. OK this is old style book form but any back can be fitted in a similar way as long as the base part is square The parts would be simple to male but you'd need to make some small drill holes to attach them.



    Ian

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    364
    thanks for all the tips.

    I've now got a good idea of what my plan is.
    The camera back won't be made of thick wood, so I don't need a drill press. I'm trying to keep it as light and compact as possible because it will be coming with me on a month long trip in Sri Lanka, so with this in mind I'd like to keep the back side and it's mate a similar size, or the back bigger if either has to be.

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    364
    just realised I made my bellows too small to be square, so the back my now not be square, but oblong...
    but as long as where they join is square it shouldn't matter right?

    edit: scratch all that, of course it's not gonna work...
    bloody hell
    Last edited by himself; 09-24-2012 at 03:04 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: because I'm stupid

  8. #18
    Steve Smith's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Ryde, Isle of Wight
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    8,596
    Images
    122
    I think it takes a few cameras before you get it right. I have just started my fourth with numbers two and three not yet complete! You think of new ideas and solve problems as you go.

    An example of this is the mechanism to rotate the front and back. For ages this was a mystery to me but after spending some time looking at pictures of cameras, mainly Wistas, I realise now how simple the mechanism is and have it drawn up to be included in the current camera.

    It was also quite a help to see Ian's Wista a few months ago. If you know anyone near to you who owns a similar camera, try to have a look at it and get the owner to show you all of it's functions/movements.

    My advice would be not to worry about getting it all perfect at first, just make a camera which you can use then learn from your mistakes and make a better one.

    If you have managed to make a rectangular bellows then make a simple camera without a rotating back. Put a tripod thread on the bottom and on one side and rotate the whole camera instead of just the back. If you want light and compact for travelling, this might help.


    Steve.
    Last edited by Steve Smith; 09-24-2012 at 05:29 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  9. #19
    jp498's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Owls Head ME
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,467
    Images
    74
    There are so many inexpensive ready-to-use cameras, I wouldn't build one unless it was for a yet unmet need.

  10. #20
    Steve Smith's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Ryde, Isle of Wight
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    8,596
    Images
    122
    But some of us enjoy the building.


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin