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  1. #11
    Newt_on_Swings's Avatar
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    need ideas about building a simple filter tray

    Maybe balsa wood from a hobby shop. Quite cheap and you can cut with a knife. Then wrap with gaffer or black tape. Or paint. You can glue balsa wood
    Very easily together too.

  2. #12
    Newt_on_Swings's Avatar
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    need ideas about building a simple filter tray

    Also I have used a moldable plastic called instamorph to create custom pieces such as camera grips. This may be a solution but it's a bit pricey for what is is. It also activates by heating it in a pot of boiling water. I am not sure if it may stand up to your enlarger lamps to long periods of time.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by ic-racer View Post
    Thin aluminum can be cut with heavy scissors.
    Tin snips are better.
    Ben

  4. #14
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    Stiff Plastic Card and the adhesive to stick it together with from a hobby/model shop would be an easy way to make one, and you could paint it with acrylic paint to match the enlarger .
    Ben

  5. #15
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    Now that is a great idea, Ben. I do have some thick plastic card but it is transparent. That 'problem' can easily be corrected as I would have to 'opaque' only the front. I have many different glues, including Gorilla glue. - David Lyga

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by David Lyga View Post
    Gorilla glue. - David Lyga
    Be careful with that stuff. It was originally designed for adhering Apes together. It swells and foams and can be a mess to work with... and takes a long time to dry. Thre are much better glues to use.

  7. #17

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    I think the hobbys shop plastic, whcih is white and opaque, is styrene. So a styrene glue would be best. A regular white glue might be best (or a carpenter's yellow glue) if you opt to use baltic plywood. The hobby shop can give you some good advise on which glue to use for the material you select.

  8. #18

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    I think the hobbys shop plastic sheets, which are white and opaque, is styrene. There are some other transparent and colored that maya be PVC. So if using styrene a styrene glue would be best. A regular white glue might be best (or a carpenter's yellow glue) if you opt to use baltic plywood. The hobby shop can give you some good advise on which glue to use for the material you select.

    Here is an example of the plastic sheet a well-supplied hobby shop should have:
    http://www.hobbylinc.com/midwest_mod...s_tubes_strips

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post
    I think the hobbys shop plastic, whcih is white and opaque, is styrene. So a styrene glue would be best. A regular white glue might be best (or a carpenter's yellow glue) if you opt to use baltic plywood. The hobby shop can give you some good advise on which glue to use for the material you select.
    The adhesive that's used for this plastic sheet Brian is a solvent cement that "welds" it together , like the adhesive that plumbers use to join plastic cold water pipes, they sell it in model shops.
    Ben

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