Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,940   Posts: 1,585,668   Online: 941
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 21
  1. #11
    benjiboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    U.K.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    7,223
    Quote Originally Posted by tkamiya View Post
    ... and something my wise mentor told me. If you have to apply more force than a light "umph", something is wrong. Never apply too much force!

    When I take my lenses apart, I always use a black marker and write a small dot ON THE LENS to show which side is top before taking out the lens out of place. It's really easy to accidentally flip them and not being able to tell which side is which.

    If you are not comfortable with this, please don't try. It's really easy to mess it up. I only do this on lenses that if I mess up, I don't have to cry.
    How do you re-collimate the lenses when you re-assemble them to ensure that the elements are centred to a datum line, and are parallel to each other ?
    Ben

  2. #12
    David Lyga's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA USA
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,350
    You, tkamiya, speak truly. And as far a flipping the elements, this is not so much a problem with 'normals', but with something like a '24', watch out! And as the 'avatar' proclaims: do not force anything.

    Benjiboy: collimating the lenses is 'done' by the very structure of the housing. Simply put them back the same way (and same side and with all rings and spacers) that they came out and you have no problems. The metal ridges on the housing guarantee proper placement. They CANNOT be out of line if you do this.

    Good you brought this up, Benjiboy, because the HARDEST thing to master is proper CLEANING of elements. If you use straight alcohol you will not remove the static electricity and the dust will cling tenaciously (even after the glass LOOKS clean by simply glancing at it but not if held up so a lit bulb is behind it). I use straight household ammonia but you can also dilute it about 1+3 if you wish. OR... a bit of tap water with a drop or two of dish liquid in a cup is good: you must put in enough dish liquid to be able to remove the static electricity, but not so much that a residue of soap remains on the glass after wiping it off. It's a bit like washing windows.

    I take a round element and do this: with CLEAN fingers spread a few drops of this cleaner on each side of the glass. Spread the liquid evenly. Then with an EXTREMELY CLEAN, SOFT tissue do this: take the element and hold it in one hand (I am left handed so I hold the element in my right hand) with only your index finger and thumb holding the sides of the element. Then, in gentle circular motion, place the tissue in your other hand and slowly turn the element as tissue contacts each side of the element. Keep turning the tissue to a clean part of the tissue (in order to prevent re-wetting dry glass). Get ALL the glass cleaned, leaving no part untouched. This not only removes all dust but treats is so that any remaining can be easily blown off (make certain that there is NO saliva near your lips!).

    The FINAL test is to do this: hold up the element to a light bulb and confirm that it is TRULY spotless. Then you must act quickly to put it back BEFORE dust settles on the glass. The FINAL, FINAL test is to hold the whole, completed lens, at max aperture, up to a lightbulb and be rewarded with a truly clean lens!

    This is easy to do if you have LOTS of practice (as I have). Remember, the static MUST be removed or you will NOT get dust-free glass. - David Lyga
    Last edited by David Lyga; 01-30-2013 at 08:38 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Central Florida, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,086
    Quote Originally Posted by benjiboy View Post
    How do you re-collimate the lenses when you re-assemble them to ensure that the elements are centred to a datum line, and are parallel to each other ?

    I don't. What do you suppose I do when faced with a lens that's pretty old and not worth enough to spend money on professional repair? Well, in those cases, I carefully take it apart, do what I can, and carefully put it together the way they came apart. It works well enough and for the purpose intended, it's fine. If I mess up, oh well...

    Obviously, I don't do this for my high-dollar Nikkors or anything else that matters.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    54
    Forgot all about this thread.

    I eventually got a pro to clean this for me, as part of a CLA for the camera body also. It came out fine and usable.

  5. #15
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Central florida,USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,848
    Images
    1
    the bright spots definately look like reflections.the dust spots are no worry.In the bottom right, I see possible oil on bldes?but I see no fungus anyehere.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    UK
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    3,560
    Quote Originally Posted by David Lyga View Post
    And, removing the elements, especially in normal lenses, is quite easy. What I do (as frugal as I am out of necessity!) is this. I take a tiny bit (1" x 1") of duct tape and fold it over a couple of times to make a tiny square. I do this twice to have two squares. Then I carefully place each square about 180 degrees apart on the metal logo ring around the front element. Then with a blund pair of scissors I carefully place each knife on a square and apply a bit of pressure and turn counter clockwise to unloosen the logo ring.

    I do not remember if this specific lens is done this way as some lenses allow one to turn (by hand) the entire front metal housing (with the filter thread). If it does not turn by hand then do what I said with the scissors. I wish you were in Philadelpha: I would do this for you. - David Lyga
    We buy medicinal ointments in plastic tubs if you keep them they are useful,
    Rubber kitchen gloves ditto.

    Scissor the gloves, into doughnut of correct size use pillbox of correct size as friction wrench.
    Eat chocolate bar...

  7. #17
    benjiboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    U.K.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    7,223
    Quote Originally Posted by Roundabout View Post
    Well, I found this http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oHr4YxbM_9Q which I don't think is exactly the same lens, but looks like enough hassle for me to get a professional to do it.
    Very wise.
    Ben

  8. #18
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Southern California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    13,956
    Quote Originally Posted by tkamiya View Post
    ... and something my wise mentor told me. If you have to apply more force than a light "umph", something is wrong. Never apply too much force!

    When I take my lenses apart, I always use a black marker and write a small dot ON THE LENS to show which side is top before taking out the lens out of place. It's really easy to accidentally flip them and not being able to tell which side is which.

    If you are not comfortable with this, please don't try. It's really easy to mess it up. I only do this on lenses that if I mess up, I don't have to cry.
    Good idea.

    Generally I have also found that if I cannot remember the last time I cleaned a lens, it is time to clean the lens.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  9. #19
    shutterfinger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Mid Peninsula, Ca.
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    577
    The best lens cleaner I have come across is a heavy weight microfiber lens cleaning cloth and ones breath. Wash the cloth regularly and air dry. Do not use fabric softener or detergents with fabric softener. I toss mine in the wash with regular fabrics and plain detergent.

  10. #20
    Theo Sulphate's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    122
    Quote Originally Posted by Mustafa Umut Sarac View Post
    Beware , if it is fungus , it spreads to all of your other lenses in the home. Its not worlds most expensive , best lens. You can replace it from ebay if it is important. Throw it. No risk you needed. Check your all other lenses also in all possible way , was the cloud there before ? Where are you living at ?
    Fungus does not spread from one lens to another. Rather, the conditions which cause fungus in one lens also cause fungus in other lenses. The prime conditions are high humidity and dust (dust is a nutrient for fungus). This is what Zeiss says about fungus: http://www.zeiss.com/camera-lenses/e...on_lenses.html

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin