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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    Personally and frankly, if my 67 starts misbehaving, it's take a deep breath and say, "thanks for the company, babe!" and discard it. And move on to something else. For now, it is "the chosen one", LOL!
    Seeing as I've come to know you as 'Mr. Pentax 67' this is a very sobering statement! It wasn't so easy for Gollum...

  2. #12

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    A quick question.. I'm not familiar with P67s so bear with me but
    aren't there lenses with shutters in em that you can use instead of the internal shutter of the body?

    Can that be the cure all to your porblem?
    Anyone can make a Digital print, but only a photographer can make a photograph.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by paul ron View Post
    A quick question.. I'm not familiar with P67s so bear with me but
    aren't there lenses with shutters in em that you can use instead of the internal shutter of the body?

    Can that be the cure all to your porblem?

    No.
    You are referring to the two leaf-shutter lenses, being the 90mm and 165mm (both f4). These are handy for raising the 67's pitiful x-sync from 1/30 to 1/60, 1/125, 1/250 or 1/500, by direct connection of flash to the lens (in leaf shutter mode).

    There is still a fundamental requirement for a shutter in the camera body
    even with leaf shutter lenses (which can be used as normal lenses at any other time). In leaf shutter mode the camera-side shutter speed is set to 1/8 second while the leaf shutter on the lens is set to your desired sync speed (as mentioned earlier). You think that's all a bit confusing? Try doing it in a hurry! And if you do get it wrong, and do not follow procedure, it can damage the leaf shutter, the mirror, the camera shutter or all three!
    Last edited by Poisson Du Jour; 02-18-2013 at 10:51 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: simplified sentence, correction of figures.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  4. #14

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    ummm I see..

    but if his shutter is inacurate but still works in slower speeds despite their accuracy, the leaf shuitters will at least guarantee him correct exposures insterad of chancy crap shots.

    I hear they also make nice boat anchors.
    Anyone can make a Digital print, but only a photographer can make a photograph.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by paul ron View Post
    ummm I see..

    but if his shutter is inacurate but still works in slower speeds despite their accuracy, the leaf shuitters will at least guarantee him correct exposures insterad of chancy crap shots.

    I hear they also make nice boat anchors.

    No.
    The camera shutter and leaf shutter must together be accurate or the overall exposure will be out. The sole purpose of a leaf shutter is higher syncronisation with flash; it will not guarantee any correct exposure if there is a fault with the shutter on the camera side; in fact, the camera may not fire at all.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    In leaf shutter mode the camera-side shutter speed is set to 1/8 second while the leaf shutter on the lens is set to your desired sync speed (as mentioned earlier).
    I should reiterate that the speed dial is the problem - which doesn't lock the mechanism properly at 1/15, 1/30 and 1/60 - essentially, when set at these speeds, it's actually in between speeds.

    If you are saying the body has to be set at 1/8, this should work, as this speed consistently locks accurately. Again, manually changing speeds to 1/15, 1/30 and 1/60 messes things up, because the speed dial is locking the mechanism in between speeds at these settings. If the leaf shutter lens 'takes over' from the speed dial I believe there's a good chance the 90mm would kick the body into action? Hope you understand me.

    Something else I should add is when in dry fire mode, pressing the shutter rapidly and cycling between speeds, all the speeds work fine and the shutter never sticks, as if I'm quickly shovelling coal into the furnace - the engine chugs along. When film is loaded, and naturally, changing speeds and pressing the shutter is more random with long intervals (looking for pictures), the camera becomes dumb. Such an odd piece of equipment. But anyway, from this idiosyncracy I know the speeds themselves are accurate.
    'Cows are very fond of being photographed, and, unlike architecture, don't move.' - Oscar Wilde

  7. #17

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    Well I know why I love my RB so much... not complicated n built like a tank.
    Anyone can make a Digital print, but only a photographer can make a photograph.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by batwister View Post
    I should reiterate that the speed dial is the problem - which doesn't lock the mechanism properly at 1/15, 1/30 and 1/60 - essentially, when set at these speeds, it's actually in between speeds.

    If you are saying the body has to be set at 1/8, this should work, as this speed consistently locks accurately. Again, manually changing speeds to 1/15, 1/30 and 1/60 messes things up, because the speed dial is locking the mechanism in between speeds at these settings. If the leaf shutter lens 'takes over' from the speed dial I believe there's a good chance the 90mm would kick the body into action? Hope you understand me.

    Something else I should add is when in dry fire mode, pressing the shutter rapidly and cycling between speeds, all the speeds work fine and the shutter never sticks, as if I'm quickly shovelling coal into the furnace - the engine chugs along. When film is loaded, and naturally, changing speeds and pressing the shutter is more random with long intervals (looking for pictures), the camera becomes dumb. Such an odd piece of equipment. But anyway, from this idiosyncracy I know the speeds themselves are accurate.

    The 67 body is only required to be set at 1/8 sec on the dial when a leaf shutter mode is engaged. At any other time its selection is arbitrary, e.g. if the aperture is set as desired and the meter needle is brought up to mid-line if the shutter speed is set to 1/8.

    All Pentax 67 bodies have the intended design function of not firing the shutter unless there is a film loaded in the chamber.
    If the camera can be dry fired — no film loaded, the safety pawl that governs the shutter release and wind-on is obviously broken, or it has been tampered with. The only way of overriding the function normally is to use a special tool that is inserted underneath the film advance lever that 'tricks' the safety catch into the function of releasing the shutter without loading film (useful for checking). This tool is supplied with the camera as OEM.

    From that last part it can be assumed the shutter speeds are accurate even if you are resorting to guessing with the "in-between" stops. I'm wondering if the dial at some stage in history has been forced beyond its limit (continued around where it usually does not). There is a pawl mechanism in the shutter speed dial that governs the click stops — an "in between" setting will render an incorrect exposure, obviously (as published by Pentax). Rapid and forceful rotation of the dial is known to strip the pawl stop out — very similar to the terribly onerous problem with Canon's EOS 5 mode dial where the click-stops are stripped out from the flimsy plastic pawl that selects the mode (the problem often recurs because of an inherent weakness in the dial's design).
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  9. #19

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    I thought it was understood that holding the notched exposure counter dial at 1 or beyond - while closing the back - the shutter can be fired all day long. This is all over the net.
    'Cows are very fond of being photographed, and, unlike architecture, don't move.' - Oscar Wilde

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by batwister View Post
    I thought it was understood that holding the notched exposure counter dial at 1 or beyond - while closing the back - the shutter can be fired all day long. This is all over the net.
    The right method also requires the key in tandem with this (if you can do it without the key I have suspicions the rewind mechanism is also compromised, but I really am speculating without seeing it); not a standard modus operandi, but often used with 220 film.

    I have my own question mark about the 67 discovered only a few days ago during a moment of mischievous boredom: that I can put the mirror up with the mirror lock-up lever and then trigger the shutter by screwing the shutter release cable into the mirror reset button (instead of the shutter release button) on the front of the body (!) This very peculiar quirk might have something to do with the factory-optioned multiple exposure facility. I was damned irritated to have wasted a frame of Velvia...
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






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