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  1. #11

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    I saw this thread browsing, so had to sign up to answer it. I have a novel angle on the problem because I've dealt with this on a Nikkormat. Firstly, switching through the shutter speed range on that Pentax will cause the needle to shift top to bottom, with no battery at all. And I highly doubt the meter cells are totally slap dead. The meter switch can be suspect, but I have a possible far out remedy. I once had a Nikkormat where I was SURE the hot wire at the battery was corroded and detached. But it wasn't. And the battery bay was pretty clean--no corrosion to speak of. Know what I finally found? The insulated battery wire has actually wicked corrosion over the years and was corroded in 2 at the OTHER END. I liked to lost my mind figuring this one out--wires are wicks like a candle wick for corrosion, and the OTHER END can be all green and crusty, and totally shot.

  2. #12
    AgX
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    Why would the meter needle move whilst turning the shutter speed step-switch with the battery off?

  3. #13

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    As I recall on the Pentaxes, the needle will peg at one extreme or the other as you move past the range where the meter is outside the the range as listed in the table in the instruction manual, as you turn the SS knob. Let's say--1/15 at 1.8 at ASA 25, or some such. Or 1/1000 at f/16 at ASA 3200, or the like. Those meters don't have the range of a hand-held, or anywhere near it. Pretty limited range, actually.

  4. #14
    AgX
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    I guess you are right concerning the meter being brought outside the range, so that shading the CDS-cell won't have a effect.

    The manual discusses in detail malfunctions of the meter. I'm sure David will be successful introubleshooting.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by AgX View Post
    I guess you are right concerning the meter being brought outside the range, so that shading the CDS-cell won't have a effect.

    The manual discusses in detail malfunctions of the meter. I'm sure David will be successful introubleshooting.
    no doubt.

  6. #16
    David Lyga's Avatar
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    John Koehrer: the needle is NOT sticky, even at either end: it moves freely.

    HTF III: everything is immaculate: no corrosion. And the needle does NOT ever move without batteries in the K1000.

    AgX: the movement of the needle in the K1000 is determined by three factors: ISO, aperture selection (via the tiny lever inside the mount), shutter speed selection. You have to remember that at some shutter speeds (depending upon ISO) the meter ceases to operates because the EV (for a particular film speed) is too low. Thus this 'sudden' movement is built-into the mechanism. It's just that we do not have the accompanying light reading to go along with that determinant in my particular case. - David Lyga

  7. #17

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    The meter appears to have two separate coils. If one of these coils is open, the meter might display the behaviour described.

    But it looks like you'll have to start checking individual components. The CDS cells should read very high in resistance when dark, the reading should fall when they are exposed to a bright light. Check the aperture and shutter resistors too. It's a dirt simple circuit, a few minutes with an ohmmeter will tell you what's wrong.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by E. von Hoegh View Post
    ... It's a dirt simple circuit, a few minutes with an ohmmeter will tell you what's wrong.
    No doubt, to quote HTF III. The manual is quite explicit in how to use said ohmmeter too!

  9. #19

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    The circuit is very simple if I could get to it. I always have problem disassemble a camera without damaging it.

  10. #20

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    The carbon surface of the diaphragm resistor is flaking off and is probably resulting in an open circuit. This is common with age among K-1000s. If adjusting your aperture has no effect on the meter, this is the problem.Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	69993Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	69994 -pictures added to show how I learned that.
    Last edited by Clovis Blevins; 06-11-2013 at 02:26 AM. Click to view previous post history.

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