Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,568   Posts: 1,545,436   Online: 1071
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 27
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Chattanooga TN
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    502
    Images
    12
    Marc - very interesting. I just sent an e-mail to Flutot's as they have a wait list. But maybe they won't be able to fix it. I didn't say which one it was, I'll send them a follow up e-mail.

    But if no parts are available, that makes me all the more curious to open it up - nothing to lose then.

    Funny it's one of the oldest models, it look like it came out of the factory yesterday, it's in wonderful condition (except that it only works at one speed plus bulb).

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    836
    Images
    42
    The Seikosha-S was actually the second generation of shutters. The really old ones are the Seikosha-MX with speeds to 1/400. Joe Lippincott's out of print 'Care and Repair of Classic Cameras has a section on opening up a Seikosha-S. Enough for basic cleaning. If you need parts you are probably into cannibalizing another shutter. Or if you find a good one, just do a swap.
    I feel, therefore I photograph.

  3. #13
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Southern California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    13,127
    Quote Originally Posted by MSchuler View Post
    I can't speak to do-it-yourself work, but if you decide to send it to a shop, I've had Flutot's Camera Repair (http://flutotscamerarepair.com/) do work on my Mamiya TLR shutters and they have done a good job.
    Strongly ===> What he said!
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  4. #14
    photopriscilla's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Miami
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    20
    Thank you! I will look into him! I have a lens problem!
    Quote Originally Posted by Chrismat View Post
    I've had Paul Ebel work on a Mamiya tlr lens that had the same problem, he did a great job since he's worked on a lot of them. Cost including return shipping was about $95, which I thought was fair.

  5. #15
    David Lyga's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA USA
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,236
    These lenses have insides that are accessible: all you have to do is unscrew both the front and rear element sets. It MIGHT be that the escape mechanism has a bit of grime in it and cannot easily be positioned at each shutter speed change. I would flush out the entire mechanism with lighter fluid after the glass has been removed and until all the liquid does not discolor any more. It just might work and it does no harm. Then dry in a warm, dry place overnight, making sure to periodically move the shutter blades completely so no liquid remains between the blades. My oven, with the pilot light on, provides an environment that is about 110 F but you could also use a hair drier to speed things up. - David Lyga

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Chattanooga TN
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    502
    Images
    12
    Thanks, David. If I can get access to actually see the shutter mechanism, it may well be something simple as you say. After all, it fires at about 1/60 and opens on bulb. I think there is more to it than removing the glass, however - I think the chrome metal on the front has to come off somehow. But I'll probably try; nothing ventured, nothing gained. And Flutot hasn't responded to my email of the other day.

  7. #17
    David Lyga's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Philadelphia, PA USA
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,236
    And you do not have to worry about getting 'helicoid grease' all over your inner mechanism because there is NO helicoid: the focus is in the Mamiya body. - David Lyga

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    836
    Images
    42
    I may have some pictures of a Seikosha-S being dismantled. PM me an email address and I will try and dig it out. If I have it it is in my previous computers' backup.
    I feel, therefore I photograph.

  9. #19
    Mark Feldstein's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Monterey, CA / BiCoastal NY
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    163
    If you haven't settled on an outfit to look at this, I highly recommend the repair guys at KEH in Atlanta. I regularly sent my 35mm gear to them, bodies and lenses, for periodic routine maintenance. They do a great job and in a timely fashion. Lately though they've gone towards a flat rate system which I don't think may be so reasonably priced. http://www.keh.com/Repair-Center.aspx

    I agree and would not attempt to do this on your own, working without a net. Lube placed in the wrong place can really mess up a lens. So can the wrong lube in the wrong place. Also it often takes some very specialized tools for everything from spring lifters/removers to pliers to screwdrivers. And if you improvise those, you might be doomed. Send it to someone who knows what they're doing especially since you got a fair price on the rig.
    Take it light ;>)
    Mark
    _________________________________
    Without guys like John Coltrane, Count Basie and Duke Ellington, life....would be meaningless.

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Chattanooga TN
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    502
    Images
    12
    Well this is interesting.....With the help of my Ed Romney repair book, some small camera repair tools I bought 13 years ago and never used until now, and a couple of shutter images provided by fellow APUGer grahamp, I actually fixed the shutter. The speed control mechanism wasn't working - the tab on it that lines up with and slows down the mainspring was not interfacing with the mainspring. When I took the speed control out, I noticed a screw lying beneath it in the shutter. The screw was supposed to screw into the speed control assembly from below, I surmised. Without it, the control lacked structural integrity and the tab could push up and was ineffective. When I reassembled everything with the screw in place, the shutter fired properly on all speeds - except 1/125, 1/250, and 1/500 all look pretty much the same. There is a lot of oil on the blades, and I think this is why. For my next trick I need to take off the rear element (haven't quite figured that out yet) and clean the blades with solvent.

    This is of course a rosy summary - the path to success actually involved a few additional learning experiences along the way, but so far so good.

    Any idea re: the best solvent? I have VM&P Naptha and barbecue lighter fluid, but no cigarette lighter fluid. I'm open to suggestions - what to use and where to get it.

    I'm now glad I did this, because I have noticed that on another lens (105mm) there is also a problem - the top three speeds all fire at 1/500-ish. But not because of oil on the blades. Now I understand the shutter, this may be an easy fix (unless attributable to missing part).

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin