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  1. #11
    David Lyga's Avatar
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    Honestly, doing this is not as daunting as you think. Work slowly and TAKE NOTES, NO MATTER HOW MUCH YOU THINK YOUR MEMORY WILL SUFFICE. There are plenty of cheap lenses around. You need a set of miniature screwdrivers (I got several sets at the Dollar Store years ago). For a 'spanner wrench' I use a very pointy pair of scissors (used for cloth)! I improvise always. Through the years I have kept tiny screws of all sizes that I keep in a small sealed container. Slowly, and frustratingly, you will learn some absolutes about lenses and also some things that can be different. You will break things. You will lose ball bearings that are used for the aperture click stops. You will lose the tiny screws that support those ball bearings.Some things you will not break. Always (and I need to learn to follow my own advice here) put a clean towel underneath the lens so that if something tiny drops you will not be searching on your floor that that item.

    Learn and understand that slow is better and still, no matter what, you will fail at times. And there really will be times that you spend many hours only to finally break the damn thing; but you have learned ... and no one can take that away from you. - David Lyga

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by David Lyga View Post
    Honestly, doing this is not as daunting as you think. Work slowly and TAKE NOTES, NO MATTER HOW MUCH YOU THINK YOUR MEMORY WILL SUFFICE. There are plenty of cheap lenses around. You need a set of miniature screwdrivers (I got several sets at the Dollar Store years ago). For a 'spanner wrench' I use a very pointy pair of scissors (used for cloth)! I improvise always. Through the years I have kept tiny screws of all sizes that I keep in a small sealed container. Slowly, and frustratingly, you will learn some absolutes about lenses and also some things that can be different. You will break things. You will lose ball bearings that are used for the aperture click stops. You will lose the tiny screws that support those ball bearings.Some things you will not break. Always (and I need to learn to follow my own advice here) put a clean towel underneath the lens so that if something tiny drops you will not be searching on your floor that that item.

    Learn and understand that slow is better and still, no matter what, you will fail at times. And there really will be times that you spend many hours only to finally break the @#!*% thing; but you have learned ... and no one can take that away from you. - David Lyga
    +100.

  3. #13

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    I use snap ring pliers as spanner wrenches. And all those sets of cheapo screwdrivers are usually too thick at the tip, and that's how you chew up screws. So I file them thinner. When screws are too tight, I use the thumb of my left hard to push down very hard on the end of the little screwdriver, and a pair of piiers on the shaft to "break" the tight screw free. That way it doesn't slip out and chew up the slot. To put screws back in, I sometimes put a dab of hot glue on the screwdriver tip to hold the screw so I can start it. All self-taught hairbrain ideas.

  4. #14
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    Thanks for sharing your experience. How about some pictures also?
    Here is a lens repair thread with some pictures: http://www.apug.org/forums/forum52/9...ro-repair.html

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom1956 View Post
    I use snap ring pliers as spanner wrenches. And all those sets of cheapo screwdrivers are usually too thick at the tip, and that's how you chew up screws. So I file them thinner. When screws are too tight, I use the thumb of my left hard to push down very hard on the end of the little screwdriver, and a pair of piiers on the shaft to "break" the tight screw free. That way it doesn't slip out and chew up the slot. To put screws back in, I sometimes put a dab of hot glue on the screwdriver tip to hold the screw so I can start it. All self-taught hairbrain ideas.
    Another problem with those cheapo screwdrivers is that they are often soft. A soft screwdriver will chew a tight screw, even if it fits perfectly while a hard screwdriver will break - usually without damaging the screwhead. A light tap on the handle of a screwdriver will ofetn break a tight screw free. And the part of the screwdriver blade which fits in the slot nust be square with parallel sides, good screwdrivers are hollow gorund. Vaseline or even spit will hold a screw on the end of the driver, although if the fit is perfect it will stay there by itself.

  6. #16
    David Lyga's Avatar
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    Very true, both Tom1956 and E von Hoegh: I had to look hard to get the REALLY tiny screwdrivers but filing is a good idea if you cannot find small enough. (IE, filing BOTH horizontally AND at the actual blade to make it thinner.) and those tiny set screws can be monumental in frustration to remove. The best thing might be to first put a drop of lighter fluid onto the screw in order to loosen any grime embedded within. And, yes, there are times I feel that I am beginning to lose the top of the screw and then I do as Tom said: put MUCH pressure on the screw and turn SLOWLY to begin its loosening. I do wish I had more pictures to illustrate this but when I work I am so frustrated that 'swearing takes over' sometimes as I talk to myself. Removing the front element usually requires unscrewing the logo ring (I place duct tape on the logo ring, 180 degrees apart, and put the 'spanner' (my pointy scissors) firmly on the tape and press down and slowly turn counter clockwise to loosen the ring. But, sometimes, it is different where one has to unscrew the sides of the barrel instead. There is simply too much to impart with focused accuracy here but take one step at a time. Sometimes, instead of removing the front it is best to remove the rear elements. Haze usually is prone at the air space separating elements before, and after the aperture blades, thus, you can often only have to remove EITHER the front or the rear in order to get at the hazed elements.

    Although I cannot guarantee to help I certainly do not mind being contacted with specific problems. Be patient as I use public computers. Also, I do not mind phoning (although, in this 'detached technological age' that might be prone to a wacky misinterpretation, so rigid have we become as a society!!!): 215.569.4949. - David Lyga
    Last edited by David Lyga; 07-10-2013 at 09:33 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #17

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    For the front rings, I go to a hardware store and find a piece of pvc pipe fitting in the plumbing section, or improvise a similar correct-diameter hollow tube. Then I tear thin strips of duct tape to make a cushion on the edge of the pipe fitting. This cushion gives friction so I can push down on that lens ring to try to get a "grab" so I can start turning. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't. Usually does eventually though. As for the super-tiny set screws, if you use a 50m lens turned-around-backwards, you will see that many of them actually have a very wide slot, and the cheapo screwdrivers may NOT be wide enough, and the slot therefore gets torn up beyond hope if you're not careful. I'm convinced if you send a lens off to Hassselblad or somesuch firm, they just throw away the screws and use new ones when they put your item back together. We don't have that luxury.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom1956 View Post
    For the front rings, I go to a hardware store and find a piece of pvc pipe fitting in the plumbing section, or improvise a similar correct-diameter hollow tube. Then I tear thin strips of duct tape to make a cushion on the edge of the pipe fitting. This cushion gives friction so I can push down on that lens ring to try to get a "grab" so I can start turning. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't. Usually does eventually though. As for the super-tiny set screws, if you use a 50m lens turned-around-backwards, you will see that many of them actually have a very wide slot, and the cheapo screwdrivers may NOT be wide enough, and the slot therefore gets torn up beyond hope if you're not careful. I'm convinced if you send a lens off to Hassselblad or somesuch firm, they just throw away the screws and use new ones when they put your item back together. We don't have that luxury.
    Look for sink stoppers, sometimes you can find them just the right size.

  9. #19
    AgX
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    My experience is that one can't have enough screwdriwers. Actually most of them would be self-modified.

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by E. von Hoegh View Post
    Another problem with those cheapo screwdrivers is that they are often soft. A soft screwdriver will chew a tight screw, even if it fits perfectly while a hard screwdriver will break - usually without damaging the screwhead. A light tap on the handle of a screwdriver will ofetn break a tight screw free. And the part of the screwdriver blade which fits in the slot nust be square with parallel sides, good screwdrivers are hollow gorund. Vaseline or even spit will hold a screw on the end of the driver, although if the fit is perfect it will stay there by itself.
    EvH, I do take issue with you on the use of grease to hold the screw on the driver. While I use that method all the time on working on machinery, autos, and the like. But when working with cameras, a wee dab of grease gets on your fingers and goes a long way. Seem like no amount of washing your fingers keeps it from getting all over the project, or it seems that way. I put a wee dab of hot glue on the driver, wait a few seconds and stick it in the screw slot. Holds tight, and after you get the screw started, the dab of hardened glue knocks right off. And no grease.
    I live literally with grease and grime on my hands, but when working with cameras, it just doesn't mix at all.

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