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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom1956 View Post
    EvH, I do take issue with you on the use of grease to hold the screw on the driver. While I use that method all the time on working on machinery, autos, and the like. But when working with cameras, a wee dab of grease gets on your fingers and goes a long way. Seem like no amount of washing your fingers keeps it from getting all over the project, or it seems that way. I put a wee dab of hot glue on the driver, wait a few seconds and stick it in the screw slot. Holds tight, and after you get the screw started, the dab of hardened glue knocks right off. And no grease.
    I live literally with grease and grime on my hands, but when working with cameras, it just doesn't mix at all.
    Well, I mentioned the grease as a means without considering it's suitability for cameras. As a watchmaker, I file and stone the screwdrivers to properly fit whatever screw they're used on, if needs be. The screws are cleaned with the rest of the watch parts, the screwholes are cleaned by screwing a peg in and out, the slots are pegged clean and the screw is then replaced by placing it with a tweezers in it's hole and tightening. Wherever possible i put the slightest hint of oil on the threads, there are places in a watch where you can't do this.

    I handle all small screws with tweezers, whether it's going in a watch, a camera, or whatever. Saves fumbling. I can write a short treatise on tweezers, their design and construction, if you like... I make my own sometimes because you can no longer find some of the special types watchmakers once used.

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by E. von Hoegh View Post
    I can write a short treatise on tweezers, their design and construction, if you like... I make my own sometimes because you can no longer find some of the special types watchmakers once used.
    I know your tongue was in your cheek... but I'd really like and appreciate that. Also a short treatise on spring puller design.

  3. #23
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    A watchmaker huh? Perfect man to ask my question. I have a Waltham pocket watch that has to be 125 years old, I'd guess. And I have to keep winding it and keep it running. Because if it stops and I have to pull out the stem, I feel like one of these times I'll break it. You have to pull on that stem so hard, practically with all your strength, and that just doesn't seem right. Otherwise it works perfectly. Inpuut appreciated.

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom1956 View Post
    A watchmaker huh? Perfect man to ask my question. I have a Waltham pocket watch that has to be 125 years old, I'd guess. And I have to keep winding it and keep it running. Because if it stops and I have to pull out the stem, I feel like one of these times I'll break it. You have to pull on that stem so hard, practically with all your strength, and that just doesn't seem right. Otherwise it works perfectly. Inpuut appreciated.
    It isn't right. Without seeing the watch I cannot tell you more.

  5. #25
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    Thanks. Guess I ought to just let it wind down and stop using it till I can afford a watchman to open it up. Probably all dried up and just raw metal-to-metal contact. Sometimes I need it though, so at those times I try to wait till it's the right time, and then wind it, so I don't have to set it. Darn nice gold watch though. Not gaudy, but very understated engraving, very fine and shallow leafwork. Thx.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom1956 View Post
    I have a Waltham pocket watch that has to be 125 years old, I'd guess. And I have to keep winding it and keep it running. Because if it stops and I have to pull out the stem, I feel like one of these times I'll break it. You have to pull on that stem so hard, practically with all your strength, and that just doesn't seem right. Otherwise it works perfectly. Inpuut appreciated.
    Don't force anything on that poor timepiece. The parts combining both winding and time setting (the keyless works) are prone to wearing out with time (a difficult to pull out stem is a sign of this) and replacing broken or severly bent parts can be difficult. As a general rule handwound mechanical watches should be serviced every 8 years.

    Most of the time watches "break" as a result of careless users or unqualified repairmen.

  7. #27
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    Thanks, folks. I promise not to expand my considerable naturally-gifted mechanical skill to watch repair. I just don't want to go there. Absolutely no room for a learning curve, One chance is all you get, or you'll have NOTHING. Too risky.

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Aron View Post
    Don't force anything on that poor timepiece. The parts combining both winding and time setting (the keyless works) are prone to wearing out with time (a difficult to pull out stem is a sign of this) and replacing broken or severly bent parts can be difficult. As a general rule handwound mechanical watches should be serviced every 8 years.

    Most of the time watches "break" as a result of careless users or unqualified repairmen.
    Tom's watch is possibly what's known as "negative set", meaning that the keyless work is naturally in the setting position; pushing the stem into the movement shifts the mechanism to the winding position and pulling it out allows a spring to shift it into the setting position. The winding crown and stem are part of the case, when the movement is out of the case it will be in setting mode. And then the watch may not be this type, Waltham used both, later watches were negative set. I sometimes carry a Waltham silver hunter with an inscription from 1883 on the case, this watch in not negative set - the stem is part of the movement and must be removed before removing the watch from the case.
    Either way the watch needs servicing and should not be used.

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by E. von Hoegh View Post
    The winding crown and stem are part of the case, ...
    As you say... it all depends upon what the watch and case really are, but it sounds like a problem with the "detent spring" in the neck of the case to me. I've experienced that with Waltham's in Philadelphia Watch Case Co cases where the spring gets dry and worn and deformed. I carry a very pedestrian 15 jewel 1883 model open-face Waltham in a gold-filled case that has at least 50% of the gold worn off. Even before me it was a well used watch... and I've been carrying it since 1978!

  10. #30
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    Wonder how much it would cost to take it to somebody. Preferably somebody who is not a boob. There's boobs out there and they don't wear signs identifying themselves.

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