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Thread: soldering

  1. #21
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom1956 View Post
    Wellers are black with a red trigger.
    I have had red Wellers.

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    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  2. #22
    AgX
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    That one is great for repairig electronics from the 60's still with "flying" connections and for general houshold works, but I would not use it to solder something on my T-90.

  3. #23
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    Ah yes -- my Weller gun is black with a red trigger. It was a much desired Christmas present for this compulsive tinkerer, circa 1956. I just used it the other day splicing some #16 stranded on a set of solenoid valves. But that was when "electronics" was Bakelite tube sockets with discrete components wired point to point between big solder lugs. IIRC, Weller is the maker of some pencil type irons that have a built-in temperature regulator that uses some magnetic properties to sense the temp; clever but expensive.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom1956 View Post
    I guess I'm just good. Been using the same Weller 100-140 watt gun since 1969, and do everything with it. No touch too fragile for me. Lot to be said for some serious heat on the small things to get that solder melted, flowed, and hardened before the components even knew you were there. Those low-power irons can be trouble.
    Don't get that Weller anywhere near anything with low voltage/low current electronics in it - which basically means everything today. It's stray field can fry modern solid-state stuff. That Dunning-Krueger effect will get you every time.

  5. #25

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    I like having a spring loader solder sucker. It sounds like a Pentax 67 shutter when it fires off. Also I use a small Scotch brand kitchen cleaning pad to keep the tip clean.

  6. #26
    David Lyga's Avatar
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    Well, rosin core solder and 'tinning' are essential, as that 'thread' continually runs through this thread. For me, the endless annoyance is the large drops that will not become smaller and refuse to 'stick' to the object unless LARGE. I solder the tiny wires that come loose and once I soldered wires on the bottom of an OM-2 and it took about 60 minutes to get it right (and about 24 curse words). I use an old Radio Shack soldering iron that looks like a thick pen. NO adjustments. NO luxury.

    Thank you for all the advice. This operation is harder than one would think but I will re-read your various bits of advice and see what gets repeated over and over again in order to prove the correct paths to follow. - David Lyga

  7. #27
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DWThomas View Post
    that was when "electronics" was Bakelite tube sockets with discrete components wired point to point between big solder lugs.
    Still is for me. It's the only branch of electronics I'm interested in now.


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by David Lyga View Post
    Well, rosin core solder and 'tinning' are essential, as that 'thread' continually runs through this thread. For me, the endless annoyance is the large drops that will not become smaller and refuse to 'stick' to the object unless LARGE. I solder the tiny wires that come loose and once I soldered wires on the bottom of an OM-2 and it took about 60 minutes to get it right (and about 24 curse words). I use an old Radio Shack soldering iron that looks like a thick pen. NO adjustments. NO luxury.

    Thank you for all the advice. This operation is harder than one would think but I will re-read your various bits of advice and see what gets repeated over and over again in order to prove the correct paths to follow. - David Lyga
    Your workpiece is not hot enough. Your soldering iron may not be properly tinned, workpieces dirty, wrong solder alloy, etc. 50/50 plumber's solder is inappropriate for electric/electronic work, because of the acid flux and the higher melting temperature. There must be a "heat bridge" of solder between the iron and the workpiece, when the workpiece is hot enough the solder will wet it, not "stick" to it.

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by David Lyga View Post
    Well, rosin core solder and 'tinning' are essential, as that 'thread' continually runs through this thread. For me, the endless annoyance is the large drops that will not become smaller and refuse to 'stick' to the object unless LARGE. I solder the tiny wires that come loose and once I soldered wires on the bottom of an OM-2 and it took about 60 minutes to get it right (and about 24 curse words). I use an old Radio Shack soldering iron that looks like a thick pen. NO adjustments. NO luxury.

    Thank you for all the advice. This operation is harder than one would think but I will re-read your various bits of advice and see what gets repeated over and over again in order to prove the correct paths to follow. - David Lyga

    If that is the case, part of the problem is your equipment. Radioshack type soldering irons have tips that do not tin well. So the heat transfer is very poor. It balls up on the tip. Also, if the solder does not "stick" to the object, then you have "wetting" problem. Also, at that point, flux, which is the resin core, has completely evaporated. So there's no wetting action. Solution to this is fairly simple actually.

    First, get a good iron. It doesn't have to be adjustable but you have to get one that does NOT have a shiny tip. It needs to be dull silver color. These will wet well and tin well.

    Second, if you end up in a situation where the solder does not flow to the object, then remove the existing solder by using "wick" type thing. Then use a thin rosin core solder and use just enough. It will flow nicely then.

    Lastly, this has more to do with technique, than equipment. It's pretty much impossible to describe this in text other than to say you need practice and experience. (which doesn't help...)

    Good luck.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  10. #30
    Paul Goutiere's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Lyga View Post
    Well, rosin core solder and 'tinning' are essential, as that 'thread' continually runs through this thread. For me, the endless annoyance is the large drops that will not become smaller and refuse to 'stick' to the object unless LARGE. I solder the tiny wires that come loose and once I soldered wires on the bottom of an OM-2 and it took about 60 minutes to get it right (and about 24 curse words). I use an old Radio Shack soldering iron that looks like a thick pen. NO adjustments. NO luxury.

    Thank you for all the advice. This operation is harder than one would think but I will re-read your various bits of advice and see what gets repeated over and over again in order to prove the correct paths to follow. - David Lyga
    At least you are doing it. I believe this is 90% of the operation.

    Practice! Practice on less important stuff, like pieces of wire old circuit boards etc.

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