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Thread: corrosion

  1. #11

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    WOW!
    Thanks for the quick comeback and all the help. I'm encouraged and ready to attack this stuff...
    Thanks again.
    Don

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by David Lyga View Post
    Naval Jelly is sold at most hardware stores and a simple application of it to the corroded area does wonders. Leave it on for about ten minutes and then wipe off with a clean cloth.

    First, try this on a tiny part that will not be noticed in case a discoloration is left on the metal. - David Lyga
    The metal on the camera that is corroding is magnesium. I would NOT recommend naval jelly; it's for iron and steel!

  3. #13
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    Thank you for the 'heads up', Professor Pixel. - David Lyga

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Prof_Pixel View Post
    The metal on the camera that is corroding is magnesium. I would NOT recommend naval jelly; it's for iron and steel!
    I talked with Todd, the technology guru at the GEH, this afternoon and he thinks it's aluminum and not magnesium.

  5. #15

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    Just got finished removing most of corrosion with vinegar water,the the stubborn spots with straight vinegar. Used a scotchbrite pad a little also.
    Letting everything dry overnight then a light touch with fine emory paper and painting (I think).
    The metal didn't react by bubbling when hit with vinegar so am sure it's not magnesium, not sure it's aluminum either seems like a zinc pot metal
    or something. I don't believe I've ever seen a white thick corrosion on any thing like that except battery posts,so am wondering about some zinc mix.
    More to come.....
    Don

  6. #16
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    Did you rinse off the vinegar just in case it has some kind of a long term reaction?
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by blindpig View Post
    The metal didn't react by bubbling when hit with vinegar so am sure it's not magnesium, not sure it's aluminum either seems like a zinc pot metal
    or something. I don't believe I've ever seen a white thick corrosion on any thing like that except battery posts,so am wondering about some zinc mix.
    More to come.....
    Don
    I'm no expert, but I believe that zinc alloys were/are used a lot for die-casting of precision parts, models, etc. ?

  8. #18

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    Aluminum that is not anodized will produce white corrosion.

  9. #19

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    Fotch, I'm going to lightly sand/blend the still painted areas to the formally corroded areas then wipe the parts with water,dry,then paint. Am thinking about spray painting with black lacquer then spraying with satin clear coat to replicate the finish. I know it won't have the texture it had originally but think it will be passable.

  10. #20

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    Be a good idea to 'treat' any area that was in contact with the vinegar with a mild solution of baking soda to eliminate any acid residue. Then a nice rinse with DI water or equal.

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