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  1. #1
    Ole
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    Building a new back?

    I have this magnificent old camera, which works great in all respects but one: It's a 18x24cm plate camera, which takes "book type" glass plate holders.

    So I would like to build a new back for it, to take "modern" 8x10" (and 18x24cm) holders. I could of course build one with a removable GG which slips out so the film holder can slip in, but that strikes me as both inelegant and somewhat risky: I don't want to accidentally step on the ground glass.

    Does anyone know of a good resource for plans and/or materials? Wood I can find, but what about springs?
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

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    BradS's Avatar
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    People tend to use spring steel or brass and immitate the Deardorff back. But there's a trick in the heating and bending I think(?). I've seen articles on the web specifically about making the springs but, can't find the link just now.

    Try to google for permutations of elements from the followin set:
    {LF, Large Format, Camera Construction, building, home brew, ...}

    If it were 4x5, I'd say get a good, used Toyo/Omega or Speed/Crown Graphic back and fasten it to a piece of baltic birch of the appropriate size. Perhaps a similar tactic would work for the 8x10?

  3. #3

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    I built a 5x7 back for my Ansco 5x7. The orginal was some sort of extended back and made focussing anything shorter then 150mm impossible. All I did was take the hardware off the old back and mount it on a new board. Depending on the size of your current back you might be able to just fit a ready made 8x10 back or to just take the hardware off an old 8x10.

  4. #4
    Ole
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    Good idea, but that necessitates finding another old 8x10". I started from the other end and got one with lensboard, good bellows, sufficient movements and all hardware. I don't think my wife would be too happy if I bought another one!
    Besides, most old 8x10" cameras here in norway seem to be either all metal studio cameras, or very old wooden 18x24cm plate cameras. Which leaves me just about where I am...
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  5. #5

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    Hi Ole,

    You could try ebay for

    other large fromat items
    film backs and holders

    8X10 backs come up all the time. The only problem is to make sure the springs clear the retainer clips on the shell. Cherry seems to be the wood of choice, baltic birch plywood is not stiff enough for 8X10.

    Good luck with it

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    Hey ole I have found this website to be pretty useful. http://www.srv.net/~vail/ he has 8x10 construction plans with printable drawings and construction techniques.
    hope this helps

  7. #7

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    Jon Grepstad has a section of his site devoted to large camera building , and a page or 2 strictly on making a back of his own design.

    Also, check the link on that page, other camera builders for more sites and info.

    Good luck,
    Nathan

  8. #8
    BradS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by phfitz
    <snip> baltic birch plywood is not stiff enough for 8X10.

    Would it not depend on what thickness baltic birch is used? I would think that a piece of 3/8 or 1/2 inch, 9 ply would probably be plenty stiff...

  9. #9
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    In a similar vein, some time back I started to design a 4x5 reducing back for my 8x10 Tachihara. Encountering problems with hardware availability, I decided to modify my (very elegant and well-designed) plan to be simply an adapter frame. That gives me a nice, multi-step light trap on the camera side and accepts currently-available Toyo backs on the other. The same frame-oriented approach might work for you, too, Ole.

    [COLOR=SlateGray]"You can't depend on your eyes if your imagination is out of focus." -Mark Twain[/COLOR]

    Ralph Barker
    Rio Rancho, NM

  10. #10
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    Ralph, that's the cat's ass! Very nice.

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