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  1. #1

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    convert 116 to accept 120

    I recently came into possession of an old Kodak No.2 folding Camera. Research has told me this camera used 116 mm film no longer available.
    My question, Can this camera be converted in any way to use 120 film in use today?
    would dearly like to use this interesting old folding camera.
    any thoughts ideas would be greatly appreciated.
    thanking you in advance for any suggestion.
    Larry B.

  2. #2
    Canuck's Avatar
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    If you had a spindle for it, you maybe able to respool it onto it. I used to do it for 620 and it worked!

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    116/616 is bigger then 120 so you can't just respool. Somebody was selling an "adapter" that fit underneat the 120 spool and above it. That let you use 120 film in 116 cameras. I don't think it was very complicated.

    OTOH you had some 116 spools and some backing paper you could buy 70mm film and respool that. You'll need to look for an old film tank that handles 116.

  4. #4
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  5. #5
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    You can get 116 from:
    https://www.central-camera.com/films4classics.asp

    The bad news is the price - probably more than the camera cost you! You could maybe pick up a roll for the spool, but it's probably cheaper to buy another camera.

    I found it looking for 122 - not THERE's a format...

    Ian

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    It may be expensive, but it's fun to put one roll of film through any camera, especially if the camera has sentimental value.

    I've shot some 122 in a Folding Pocket Kodak 3A and it's interesting. Even if I don't put many rolls through that camera, I had some interesting comments while I had it on a tripod in public. These bigger/older cameras are attention getters to some extent.
    Diane

    Halak 41

  7. #7
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    There are several methods of converting 116 cameras to use 120 film. The simplest is to put spacers at one end of the 120 spools (so you're shooting off center in the original frame mask), to put the 6x4.5 framing track under the red window and the camera's film advance key operating directly on the 120 spool; you can temporarily mask off the original frame with gaffer tape, or use a piece of opaque plastic for a more durable mask, to provide a support for the otherwise free-hanging edge of the film. You'll have to use about 2.5 frames on the 6x4.5 track to cover the 11 cm frame of the 116 camera, and you'll then get 6 images on a roll.

    Alternately, if you have a couple 116 spools, you could buy some 70 mm bulk film, cut it to the appropriate length, make up backing paper from two strips of 120 backing (putting the 6x6 framing track under the red window), and use every other number, again getting six frames on a roll the same length as 120. You'd need a 70 mm reel, of course (most older plastic tanks accepted 116, though eBay sellers aren't likely to know it), and the emulsion choices in 70 mm are somewhat limited, but it would let you shoot in the original format (with only a small intrusion of the sprocket holes in the extreme edges of the image).

    I've seen web pages that outlined both of these methods; you can easily find them if you google on "116 120 (convert, conversion)" (without the quotes , of course).
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Donald Qualls
    There are several methods of converting 116 cameras to use 120 film. The simplest is to put spacers at one end of the 120 spools (so you're shooting off center in the original frame mask), to put the 6x4.5 framing track under the red window and the camera's film advance key operating directly on the 120 spool; you can temporarily mask off the original frame with gaffer tape, or use a piece of opaque plastic for a more durable mask, to provide a support for the otherwise free-hanging edge of the film. You'll have to use about 2.5 frames on the 6x4.5 track to cover the 11 cm frame of the 116 camera, and you'll then get 6 images on a roll.

    Alternately, if you have a couple 116 spools, you could buy some 70 mm bulk film, cut it to the appropriate length, make up backing paper from two strips of 120 backing (putting the 6x6 framing track under the red window), and use every other number, again getting six frames on a roll the same length as 120. You'd need a 70 mm reel, of course (most older plastic tanks accepted 116, though eBay sellers aren't likely to know it), and the emulsion choices in 70 mm are somewhat limited, but it would let you shoot in the original format (with only a small intrusion of the sprocket holes in the extreme edges of the image).

    I've seen web pages that outlined both of these methods; you can easily find them if you google on "116 120 (convert, conversion)" (without the quotes , of course).
    We will have unperforated Efke R100 on 70mm bulk rolls in a few weeks.

  9. #9
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jandc
    We will have unperforated Efke R100 on 70mm bulk rolls in a few weeks.
    Excellent, for those interested in reviving 116/616 cameras (and there were some good ones, like the Kodak Monitor 616). I got rid of my only developing tank that would accept 70 mm, unfortunately, but I also don't have any cameras in that size.
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

  10. #10

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    116 tanks are usually pretty cheap. I picked up two for $1. I think I over paid considering how hard they are to use in comparison to modern tanks.

    OTOH a few companies sell 70mm reels intended for medical lab use. The reels are MUCH cheaper then any 70mm reel labeled for photograpic use. The only problem is no daylight tank I know of will handle them. So it's a dark only thing.

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