Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,914   Posts: 1,556,275   Online: 824
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 24
  1. #1
    Surly's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    104
    Images
    5

    4x5 box camera shutter advise

    I want to build a box camera- I have a (actually two) 165mm process lenses.
    The lens covers 4x5 with a reasonable focus distance. It's a little long for "fixed focus" so I will probably make some sort of focus mount. I would like a shutter that has "time" and "instantaneous" like the old brownies and such.
    Has anyone out there made this type of shutter? The shutter design in the Holga would work but the rear element of my lens is roughly 1.5"
    I dont want to use a Packard. Nothing against Packard I just want to build the shutter myself and I dont want it pneumatic.
    Any other suggestions for the overall deign are certainly welcome.
    Check out BoxCameras.com if you are intersted in box cameras, also. No affiliation, I just found the site.
    Thanks, Surly

  2. #2
    Surly's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    104
    Images
    5
    Oh yeah, I forgot to add that I own "Photographic Cameras and accessories" by Paul Hasluck. I'm looking for something other than what is in that book. Thanks.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,453
    Um, er, ah, why not simply mount your process lens in front of an ex-Polaroid MP-4 Copal #1 shutter? Inexpensive, easily found, timed speeds from 1/1 to 1/125, no fuss, no muss. Vignetting shouldn't be a problem with no movements.

    Do it y'rself is well and good, but why settle for an inferior product? Make or improvise the mount adapter y'rself if you must do something.

  4. #4
    Surly's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    104
    Images
    5
    That's a good suggestion, Dan. It's not quite what I am looking for, however. If I was wanting a shutter like that I could make the front of the box accept Calumet lens boards and just slap one of my other lenses in there.
    As for inferior, It's a box camera. I have a Calumet view and a Super Graphic.
    Perhaps I'm just peeing in the wind. Heck, I cant even spell advice. ;>)
    Surly

  5. #5
    Ole
    Ole is offline
    Ole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Bergen, Norway
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    9,281
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    31
    Since you don't want a Packard, how about a Thornton-Picard? Simple pull-cord things; usuallt triggered with air, but can be used in a number of different ways. T, B and variable time in a small wooden box (with "ripcord").
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,974
    Images
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Surly
    Perhaps I'm just peeing in the wind.
    I understand...

    I'm currently collecting ice cream sticks (If you don't know what these are... it's too hard to explain! cross-contienent differences!) to build something like a box camera. You can buy these things in bulk in packets but my twist is they have to be all from ice creams eaten by my family (75% me!)

    Why, cause... that's why!

  7. #7
    Surly's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    104
    Images
    5
    Nige,
    We have ice cream sticks up here. Sometimes we call em popsicle sticks. The kiddies in grade school make crafts out of them.
    Yes, the point is I want to do it myself. I want to make all the things I can actually make on a camera. I have a lens and I'm making almost everything else (theoretically).
    wish me luck.

  8. #8
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    North Carolina, USA (transplanted from Seattle)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,845
    Surly, it occurs to me that with a process lens you probably aren't going to need high shutter speeds -- a rotary shutter (like in your Holga) with B capability, operated by a locking cable release to give walk-away time exposures, would probably do very nicely. You'd get one "instant" speed (potentially adjustable by swapping a spring or adding/subtracting mass on the rotary disk), and B, and you could make the thing easily from hobby brass and music wire from the local model airplane shop. The shutter need not even be huge; it only has to accommodate an opening the size of the largest stop in the lenses, if you can somehow mount it between the groups just ahead of or behind the aperture (should be at least as large as the back element if you mount the shutter behind the lens, though). I've seen these in old roll film box cameras that had disks as much as three inches across, giving about 1/25.
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    965
    Images
    58
    Maybe I'm a bit outdated here (it's been a while since I last posted, or for that matter browsed through the forums), but a while back someone here made a "gravity shutter" by building a box around the lens and having the foward side (perhaps made out of styrofoam) slide down in front of the lens. If I recall correctly, different sized horizontal gaps in the front side provided different shutter speeds (since they all fall at the same speed, etc..)

    I thought that this might go well with the box camera theme.

    Good luck,

    André

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    NYC
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,346
    Even in the U.S. "ice cream sticks" may be misconstrued. Aside from popsicle sticks, and their kin from ice cream bars, in New England we had little dogbone-shaped sticks used with ice cream cups. These are little (about 4" diameter x 2" deep) cardstock (now plastic) cups full of ice cream. In Boston we referred to them as Hoodsies, after the Hood Milk Co that made them. I know you didn't want to get into it, but just which "ice cream sticks" are you using? I don't think the Hoodsie sticks would be usable above 35mm.

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin