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  1. #11

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    All of these tips you received are fine but at least you are now in the position of building a nice cozy fire. Try that with your polycarbonate.

    Good luck
    Claire

  2. #12
    Murray@uptowngallery's Avatar
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    So what kind of beast lens is that?

    Another thought I had was a machinist 'hogging out' a body from one piece of metal. I've seen that done (not for a camera, however). It seemed like a waste of a cube of aluminum but it was the only solution.

    Murray
    Murray

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by gregdavis
    Phenolic resin will work for your application, as Donald suggested. Go to www.mcmaster.com and search under plastics for "garolite". [...]-Greg
    Ah, good tip. I do appreciate it Greg. Don, you too. Thanks. Black 1/8 and 1/4" should work out very well. And it is light, too!

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Murray@uptowngallery
    So what kind of beast lens is that?
    Murray
    The second proof-of-performance prototype is here: http://elearning.winona.edu/jjs/nl

    (The first was a crude wooden platform - literally, a platform with an 110v shutter.)

    However, the lens I'm working on now (#3) is is machined differently, using a Copal #2, and we are retaining the filter holder... and of course, getting rid of that Sinar body.

  5. #15
    Mongo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jjstafford
    The second proof-of-performance prototype is here: http://elearning.winona.edu/jjs/nl
    That is a spectacular piece of glass! I want one...but then who wouldnt.
    Film is cheap. Opportunities are priceless.

  6. #16
    barryjyoung's Avatar
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    Laminate hardwood veneer and rotate each layer 45 degrees or so making your own plywood in whatever shape you like. Or just use aluminum. You can work it with a portable drill and files. Just go slow and be careful. Or get a machinist to do it for ya.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mongo
    That is a spectacular piece of glass! I want one...but then who wouldnt.
    What a monster. Where did you find that piece of glass or did you make it?
    ~John~
    --------------------------
    www.johnbrewerphotography.com
    There are 10 types of people in this world - those who understand binary and those who don't.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by John_Brewer
    What a monster. Where did you find that piece of glass or did you make it?
    Here is more: http://elearning.winona.edu/jjs/proto/

    I got several of these lenses through a government sale. I kept four good ones, and turned the rest back to the market, giving one away and sacrificing another to a bad job of disassembly.

  9. #19
    Ole
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    With a lens that big and heavy, wouldn't it be easier to make a camera back and mount it to the lens? A strong cradle for the lens, a lighter one for the back. Bag bellows between. Since the "camera" wouldn't be carrying the weight of the lens, it can be much lighter and simpler.

    Just a thought...
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ole
    With a lens that big and heavy, wouldn't it be easier to make a camera back and mount it to the lens? A strong cradle for the lens, a lighter one for the back. Bag bellows between. Since the "camera" wouldn't be carrying the weight of the lens, it can be much lighter and simpler.

    Just a thought...
    My drawings are abysmal, I know. (did you see them on the second page?) Let me try to clarify: the lens and frame is one piece attached to the tripod block. The back moves back and forth on the rail on the and is not stressed.

    Here's a larger sketch. The bottom shows a shadow where the tripod screw goes into the block. http://elearning.winona.edu/jjs/proto/NW13.jpg

    The tripod block is at the balance point and can be moved a bit left anyway.

    A bag bellows is a good idea. Thanks!

    Dunno. Is that more clear or am I still missing something?

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