Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,895   Posts: 1,520,956   Online: 879
      
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 38
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,319
    Murray, you're a nut case, but then, so am I. And I do enjoy reading about the predicaments you get yourself into. These days bandwidth is cheap, hog away.

    More seriously, if you want to try the lens out to see if it works horribly, why don't you hang it in front of a 35 mm SLR? You won't be able to judge coverage that way, but you will be able to see if its central image quality justifies further fiddling.

    Go on having fun,

    Dan

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    san jose, ca
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,521
    Images
    77
    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Fromm
    Murray, you're a nut case, but then, so am I. And I do enjoy reading about the predicaments you get yourself into. These days bandwidth is cheap, hog away.

    More seriously, if you want to try the lens out to see if it works horribly, why don't you hang it in front of a 35 mm SLR? You won't be able to judge coverage that way, but you will be able to see if its central image quality justifies further fiddling.

    Go on having fun,

    Dan
    I'm with Dan on this one. I am alot like Murray in that I start a lot of projects and some even get finished. But, Dan has the right idea. Get a 2 1/4 Speed and hang the next 20 projects on that basic frame. It should be in every photo-tinkers toolbox. I am convinced there is NOTHING you can't do with an old Speed Graphic. So far, the only thing I haven't been able to prove is getting a Osscillo-raptar to focus at infinity on one. I need to get a new lensboard for my 2 1/4 Crown to maybe make that work.

    My next project is taking a broken shutter assembly with a 180mm Mamiya TLR lens in it and using it on my 2 1/4 Speed.

    Goodluck Murray,

    tim in san jose
    Where ever you are, there you be.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,319
    Tim, I'm sorry and ashamed to report that I've found a few things that can't be done with a 2x3 Speed. But a Speed Graphic is just the thing for putting barrel lenses to good use without a lot of effort or vast expense.

    Two of my impossibilities are mount and use 3"/2.0 and 6"/2.8 Elcans, both ex-F95. The lenses' barrels are too big to clear the front standard, their back focuses are too short to let them make infinity with the bellows fully compressed. The 1.75"/2.8 Elcan, also ex-F95, is another thing entirely, works just fine but covers no more -- and I'm being generous about corner sharpness -- than 6x7.

    Another is use a lens much longer than 12". Imagine being limited to lenses no longer than ~ 135 mm on a 35 mm camera. Well, that's where we are with little Graphics.

    Yeah, camera mutilation is always a possibility, but not yet for me.

    Cheers,

    Dan

  4. #14
    Murray@uptowngallery's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Holland, MI
    Shooter
    Pinhole
    Posts
    1,028
    I thought I would be quiet and skulk away for awhile because I found more amputated parts that might suit me for a back, but here I am again. The Agfa has 4 screws EASILY accessible along the film gate, probably to access the bellows attachment, and I cannot get any screwdrivers to start the screws loose, just tearing the heads up worse and worse. I may have to grind them off, of course, not having a Dremel tool to get in there. A file might mess up the rest of the material too much.

    I don't have any doubts about this lens' quality or 35 mm coverage, so no need to go there. The underlying theme is to prove it covers 645 adequately, and hopefully get some proof of it's quality.

    BTW, what is ex-F95 I keep reading in Dan's posts? Is that a camera of aircraft, or neither?

    M
    Murray

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    san jose, ca
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,521
    Images
    77
    Quote Originally Posted by Murray@uptowngallery

    BTW, what is ex-F95 I keep reading in Dan's posts? Is that a camera of aircraft, or neither?

    M
    I believe these are Canadian made Leica lens made for the military.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Fromm
    Another is use a lens much longer than 12". Imagine being limited to lenses no longer than ~ 135 mm on a 35 mm camera. Well, that's where we are with little Graphics.
    Well, to be expected from the intended use of the speed. I would think a 300mm lens would be the limit of what you could reasonably handhold doing street or sports reporting photography. As far as corner coverage, my favorite back is a 6x6 roll film back. Most lens I have used will cover this format.

    I am off to hang a 180 tack sharp Jena Tessar on my 3x4 Speed. It's an easier conversion than the Mamiya and I want it for this weekend. John sent me some Efke 25 and I suspect this is going to be a nice combination.

    tim in san jose
    Where ever you are, there you be.

  6. #16
    Murray@uptowngallery's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Holland, MI
    Shooter
    Pinhole
    Posts
    1,028
    That's an interesting idea too. Thanks.
    Murray

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,319
    F95?

    Vinten F95. Aircraft camera, UK made, from sometime (I think) in the mid-'50s to the early '90s, used by > 30 air forces and by commercial firms, universities, ... too. Focal plane shutter. Image motion control. Eventually with auto exposure. Numerous models, later ones took lenses with shorter back focus than the original. Originally offered with 4"/2 or 12"/4 Taylor Hobson, switched to mainly Elcan lenses in the mid-60s, also eventually offered with 38/4.5 Biogon. Alternative normal lenses included 4"/1.9 Dallmeyer Rareac, 4"/1.8 Taylor Hobson, 98/1.4 Wild Heerbrugg Falconar.

    The camera part of Wm. Vinten was spun off, the last I heard it is part of Thales Optronics, a french firm, and trades as Thales Vinten. Thales was recently in merger talks with EADS, don't know how they have progressed.

    The tripod-making part of Wm. Vinten still exists as Vintec, makes and sells Vinten tripods. Vintec owns, among others, Gitzo and Manfrotto.

    All of the ex-F95 lenses I've been able to try out have been ok or better.

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,319
    Tim, I'm with Murray in that I, um, abuse equipment by trying to use it in ways its maker never intended.

    From my perspective, 2x3 Graphics are tools for shooting 2x3. They're more than good enough for what I do and are affordable. I bought one because I wanted to shoot 2x3, not because I wanted to do "Leica + normal lens" things in 2x3, if you see what I mean.

    Cheers,

    Dan

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Montgomery, Il/USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,995
    Murray,
    you can drill the heads off the screws using the Dremel & a drill bit. All it's going to take is to go through the head itself, leaving the shaft. It should be a straight shot for you.

  10. #20
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    North Carolina, USA (transplanted from Seattle)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,845
    Or, since you don't *have* a Dremel, you can do the same with a regular power drill. The trick is, once the screw head is badly thrashed, trying to get the drill to start centered on the screw head. If you have a drill press, you might be able to purchase a Dremel burr bit and chuck that in the drill press, then use it to "mill" off the screw heads. Might work, might not, but be very careful in doing this sort of thing with a drill press; significant side forces can unseat the chuck from the spindle, which gets exciting if you have it spinning at the higher speeds (say, 1500 rpm) at the time...
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin