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  1. #181

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    Quote Originally Posted by Erik L View Post
    Here's a few pics of my first attempt at camera building. It actually came out ahead of my expectations It is made out of cherry and aluminum with a hacksaw, drill and router and a little powder coating done in my pottery kiln.
    It has maximum extension of 33 inches. Back shift, base tilt, rise and swing and front base tilt, rise and axis tilt. Finished in danish oil. The dreaded "hacksaw" springs will be replaced if I get around to it. They seem to work fine for now. I paid for the bellows, I'm not there yet, but I will give bellow making a try on the next one. It fits easily in my f64 backpack. I am quite pleased all in all.
    regards
    Erik

    Erik, that's incredible! Great work!

    Jim, nice to see more pictures of yours. Love that walnut. I'm starting to get the camera-making fever again!:-D
    Last edited by Colin Graham; 10-25-2007 at 10:31 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #182

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    Thanks Colin! This thread is what inspired me to give it a try. After seeing all the inventive people and their ideas, it was just a matter of "just do it" It is rather fun I think to use something home made, a little pride maybe and more connection to the act of shooting, at least in my case.
    regards,
    Erik

  3. #183
    Jim Fitzgerald's Avatar
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    Eric, very nice job for the first camera! It is great to use a camera that you build yourself. I guess I should post the 11x14 I just finished here to make it official.

    Jim
    Last edited by Jim Fitzgerald; 11-02-2008 at 12:51 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  4. #184

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    Man, I think Erik's camera is the best homemade I've seen period, first camera or not.

    But Jim, I'm really curious about those wooden standards. Is the rear standard articulated? Are they very strong? Interesting approach.

  5. #185
    Jim Fitzgerald's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Colin Graham View Post
    Man, I think Erik's camera is the best homemade I've seen period, first camera or not.

    But Jim, I'm really curious about those wooden standards. Is the rear standard articulated? Are they very strong? Interesting approach.
    Colin, yes to both questions. I was trying to reduce the weight and I wanted to see if my design would be strong enough. It is stable. Could it be more so? More than likely but I think if my building tolerances were tighter it would be. Remember I'm using mostly hand tools.

    JIm

  6. #186

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    No shame in handtools. My first cameras I used a hand drill and tiny files to make all the metal parts. I still use hand planes and chisels for most of the fit and finish of the woodworking. I hate power tools generally, routers I loathe especially, nothing ruins the peace of a quiet afternoon faster. What woodworkers in the Queen Anne period could do with hand tools simply beggars the imagination.

  7. #187
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Colin Graham View Post
    I hate power tools generally, routers I loathe especially.
    Me too. I only use a power tool if I absolutely have to. In my other life as a rock 'n' roll guitar hero I like to have full use of all of my fingers. I think the potential for error is much lower with hand tools.

    I used to watch New Yankee Workshop on TV and I was amazed that even putting in small nails was done with a huge compressed air nail gun.



    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  8. #188
    Jim Fitzgerald's Avatar
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    I like the feel you get with a finely honed chisel. They way it slices the wood and the control is nice. The hand finishing process is really rewarding when the polish appears. I love my dovetail saw!!

    Jim

  9. #189

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    I used to watch New Yankee Workshop on TV and I was amazed that even putting in small nails was done with a huge compressed air nail gun.

    Steve.
    I know! I have a morbid fascination with those woodworking shows. There's another one on PBS in the US called The Router Workshop. Everything gets the treatment. The dust and din reminds me of what it might be like to work in a grain silo being filled.

    The power goes out here so often it's nice to be able to keep working. It reminds me of being out in the field with a camera. There's a calm deliberation to the craft of it that makes it equally rewarding in its own way.

  10. #190
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    When I was doing woodworking I used to go to the woodworking shows held in Atlanta and alternating Anaheim, Norm Abram was always there at the Delta booth, he's a year older than me and a great guy, very friendly. After a couple of times he remembered my name.

    I took a router workshop from Bob Rosendahl, a Canadian, in Seattle a bunch of years ago. he can work so fast it's unbelievable. Like professionals in other fields the proficiency is very high.
    Everytime I find a film or paper that I like, they discontinue it. - Paul Strand - Aperture monograph on Strand



 

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