Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,445   Posts: 1,570,000   Online: 887
      
Page 5 of 37 FirstFirst 123456789101115 ... LastLast
Results 41 to 50 of 361
  1. #41
    barryjyoung's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Near Seattle WA, USA
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    411
    Images
    2
    Hi John:

    The glue you see squeezed out is Titebond polyureathane glue that John Austin used. Another member Steve Allen also used poly glue. I prefer Titebond aliphatic resin (yellow) glue myself since it never moves the parts after I have them positioned. But I would be the first to admit that poly is stronger. I have up to this point used epoxy for everything camera related, but for the baseboard I saw no need.

    Barry Young
    cameramaker.com


    Quote Originally Posted by John Bartley
    Barry,

    In the picture of the assembled baseboard, there seems to be a foam being squeezed from between the plys. I'm guessing it's the glue. Can you tell us what type of glue you are using and possibly the brand name? Would I be right in suspecting a urethane glue?

    cheers and thank you
    Barry Young
    Young Camera Company

  2. #42
    John Bartley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    13 Critchley Avenue, PO Box 36, Monteith Ont, P0K1P0
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    1,397
    Quote Originally Posted by barryjyoung
    Hi John:

    The glue you see squeezed out is Titebond polyureathane glue that John Austin used. Another member Steve Allen also used poly glue. I prefer Titebond aliphatic resin (yellow) glue myself since it never moves the parts after I have them positioned. But I would be the first to admit that poly is stronger. I have up to this point used epoxy for everything camera related, but for the baseboard I saw no need.

    Barry Young
    cameramaker.com
    Thank you again.

    cheers

  3. #43

    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Wellington, New Zealand
    Shooter
    Med. Format Pan
    Posts
    279
    Quote Originally Posted by barryjyoung

    Barry Young
    cameramaker.com
    Barry

    I just visited your website and am impressed with what you guys are up to. I hope the work rolls in and becomes a successful enterprise.

    I have a question for you........how far will you go taking on oddball one of a kind jobs? I ask because I always have jobs like this to be done but have trouble finding anyone with the expertise, equipment and desire to take on the challenge of a one off that no one else has dreamed up!

    Clayton

  4. #44
    barryjyoung's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Near Seattle WA, USA
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    411
    Images
    2
    Hi Clayton, thank you for visiting my website, now there are three of us who have been there. You, me and my mom.

    As to oddball work. if it is photo related it is less because I love photo equipment more than I love my dog. If it is non photo related (like parts for your vintage Octavian motorcycle) the price goes way up because if I were to need to make stuff I was not fascinated with I can draw really great camera plans while my CNC machine is busily making me some really good coin making intricate airplane and spacecraft parts.

    If it is work that is truly custom and one time, it is expensive. This is because all the set up and learning curve stuff eveyone tells you about must be applied to that one part. People who are not familiar with machining are usually amazed that it can take two or three days days to make the tooling and to set up an operation that takes 10 minutes to run. Often the run time is free and the set up is all you pay for. So that is why the "one off" part can be a very expensive proposition. On the other hand, some parts that may SEEM custom do not require an oddball set up, custom tooling, or custom fixturing. If I can hold it with standard clamping and workholding stuff I have on hand, and if it does not require that I grind a custom profile cutter, and if you don't need it from some whacko material only found in one particular village in some extremely remote section of the far flung Isles of Langerhans or Teirra Del Fuego or something, and if you do not need it to be accurate within 2.6 millionths of an inch, and if it doesn't have too many compound angles for me to actually have to think about, and if you don't absolutely have to have it last week, and if the coffee is freshly brewed and in my cup, then it isn't too expensive even though it is something we both know I will never make again.

    On the other hand, if you and the other Ermanox collectors out there need a shutter release button for that extremely rare camera, I can not make you too great a deal because the only other ermanoxes out there are in museums who have their own machinists on staff for just such an emergency and therefore I will never make another. However, if there is the inkling of a chance that I can ever sell one of those rare doohickey's I will do everything I can to make as much of the pain of set up expense get spread out over as many parts as possible. I mean that. I am willing to eat a lot of the set up expense to try and build a line of goods that people will buy. I really meant that about being customer driven. Another thing. I have done a lot of nondisclosure work for private individuals and also for government agencies that don't have names but only have acronyms nobody ever heard of. If you want to patent your idea, I am your guy. I never ever let out a peep.

    So, there is one really long winded answer to a very simple question, sorry about that, my first editor is rolling over in his grave as I write this. I hope it answered some of what you asked me.

    Now the short version. Send me an email with all the info you have and I will try to make you happy. What are you making anyway?

    Thanks for the inquiry.

    Barry Young
    cameramaker.com


    Quote Originally Posted by claytume
    Barry

    I just visited your website and am impressed with what you guys are up to. I hope the work rolls in and becomes a successful enterprise.

    I have a question for you........how far will you go taking on oddball one of a kind jobs? I ask because I always have jobs like this to be done but have trouble finding anyone with the expertise, equipment and desire to take on the challenge of a one off that no one else has dreamed up!

    Clayton
    Barry Young
    Young Camera Company

  5. #45
    Laurent's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    France
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,209
    Blog Entries
    22
    Images
    137

    My home built camera, Jon Grepstad's design

    Hi,

    before updating the article (sorry the veeeeerrrrrrryyyy long delay since the first draft), here are some pics of my camera.

    It works fine, the focus is right on the film plane, is light tight...

    As soon as I have finalized the french article, I'll update the english one.

    Cheers
    Laurent
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Photo06_6_small.jpg   Photo07_7_small.jpg   Photo14_14_small.jpg  

  6. #46
    nick mulder's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    1,204
    Images
    14
    Quote Originally Posted by Laurent
    Hi,

    before updating the article (sorry the veeeeerrrrrrryyyy long delay since the first draft), here are some pics of my camera.

    It works fine, the focus is right on the film plane, is light tight...

    As soon as I have finalized the french article, I'll update the english one.

    Cheers
    Laurent
    thats a very crisp bellows - did you make it yourself ? If so what are the materials ? have you also a longer rail for macro ? or are you keeping it short so its not a hassle in carrying ?

    cheers for the pics - all good !

  7. #47

    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Wellington, New Zealand
    Shooter
    Med. Format Pan
    Posts
    279
    Barry

    I appreciate the time and effort you put in to respond to my question, it helps understanding where you're coming from. I've had custom equipment built in the past and realise the project can get out of hand for many reasons. I'll send you an email with some ideas I have to get better use out of my large format camera.....sorry I don't have one of those Octavian motorcycle thingies.

    While we're talking motorcylces...........yesterday the movie "The World's Fastest Indian" was released. This is a locally made movie (in NZ) about an old guy that rebuilt his 1920's Indian into a 170mph speed machine.......he ran it on the Salt Flats in the 60's & 70's...........now Barry......if you could build me one of these??

    cheers
    Clayton

  8. #48
    Laurent's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    France
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,209
    Blog Entries
    22
    Images
    137
    Hi Nick,

    no, the bellows is not DIY. It is a used Cambo bellows I got for a decent price ( 100 € ) and it's mint.

    Laurent

  9. #49
    barryjyoung's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Near Seattle WA, USA
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    411
    Images
    2
    Sorry Clayton. I am barely keeping up with what I am doing now.

    Barry Young



    Clayton[/QUOTE]
    While we're talking motorcylces...........yesterday the movie "The World's Fastest Indian" was released. This is a locally made movie (in NZ) about an old guy that rebuilt his 1920's Indian into a 170mph speed machine.......he ran it on the Salt Flats in the 60's & 70's...........now Barry......if you could build me one of these??

    cheers
    Clayton[/QUOTE]
    Barry Young
    Young Camera Company

  10. #50

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,146
    Cambara II
    Built: 10/2005 (wood needs to be oiled yet)
    - Takes lenses from 135 - 300mm
    - bellows allow limited movements with 150mm lens (A bag bellows may be needed); no practical limits with longer lenses
    - Rotating back
    - Geared focussing; the adjustment knob is removable
    - Quickfix for setting front standard at optimum position for 150mm & 210mm lenses.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails cambara-II-00.jpg   cambara-II-01.jpg   cambara-II-02.jpg  



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin