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  1. #1

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    Need slow shutter speeds

    Hello
    Older cameras seldom have shutters with slow speeds (I mean speeds between ¼ secs to 1 or 2 secs); however, if the camera is in “B” mode, it might be possible to release the shutter at those low speeds, at least in theory, if we use a modern camera shutter controlling the shutter speed of the older camera trough a release cable. It is possible to use a modern shutter (with slower speeds) and connect it to the older camera shutter. Has anyone tried something like this ? Or is there already any specific device that can be connected to older cameras in order to allow them to shoot at slow speeds ?
    Thanks for any information and/or comment
    Bluewind

  2. #2
    Ole
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    I find it to be no problem at all getting consistent shutter times from 1/4 to about 30 seconds using just a cable release. Anything within 10% of the correct time is going to be better than the specifications for a brand new shutter! Even 30% is acceptably consistent - maybe not if you're shooting Velvia, but how consistent is that reciprocity error correction anyway?
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
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  3. #3
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    Ole is right but if anyone wanted to play the mad engineer they could build an electronically controlled solenoid that actuates through a cable release. Make it battery powered and small enough to hang on an LF standard and you might have something worth selling. It shouldn't be much problem to make it time from 1/4 sec to several minutes.
    Gary Beasley

  4. #4
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Consider that musicians need to be able to do things like press and release a button with a precision on the order of a few thousandths of a second, and you should have no trouble timing 1/4 sec. Use a metronome set to 120 (or 240 if you have an electronic metronome) and subdivide in your head, and you'll probably be more accurate than many mechanically timed shutters.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  5. #5

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    an autoknips would do it.


    I'm not sure if this is the correct type. Some of them have a timer that will release the shutter after a set time. You just set the time to "B" on your lens, the autoknips will trigger the shutter and then release after the set time.

    http://cgi.ebay.com/Shutter-release-...QQcmdZViewItem

  6. #6
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BlueWind
    Hello
    Older cameras seldom have shutters with slow speeds (I mean speeds between ¼ secs to 1 or 2 secs)
    Which older cameras? You mean from the 19th century? All of my oldest cameras (pre-War models dating from before 1926 to 1935) have Compur shutters with timed speeds down to 1 second. Anything longer than that, I can easily do with a cable release, and 1/2 isn't hard. Timing 1/4 with a cable release is a little tricky, but if you shoot two, it's very likely one will be within a half stop (after a little practice with a stop watch, that is).

    Trying to get another shutter to control the one that doesn't have the speeds you want seems a major violation of the KISS principle, and likely to cause one to run afoul of the Murphy police (they're the folks who make sure that whatever can go wrong, will, and at the worst possible time).
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

  7. #7
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    For shutter speeds starting at 2sec, you could use something like the Prontor Zeitauslöser. There's one on eBay right now here - but they tend to be expensive.

  8. #8

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    Donald, the original poster is probably thinking of cheap old cameras with cheap shutters. For example, Varo, Lukos. The Compurs you mentioned are, relatively, high end.

  9. #9

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    Need slow shutter speeds

    Hi
    Thanks for your comments. I’m trying to get speeds between ¼ secs and 2 secs, in some Russian TLRs (Komsomolets and Lubitel 2). The Lubitel 2 has speeds above 1/15 and the Komsomolets has speeds above 1/25, and I want something slower. My idea was to take a working shutter from a dead camera and connect it to a cable release (no electronics involved); I’m not looking for a very high degree of precision, but I’m not so experienced (yet) as to be able to keep a shutter open within the range of speeds I mentioned. My options seem to be either a) find/build a device to do it or b) spoil a lot of film while I learn to do it on my own ...
    Thanks again
    Bluewind

  10. #10
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    If I know I will be using some of my antiques with questionable speed shutters, I stick an FM body in my shirt pocket. I can listen to those speeds several times and get so close with a cable release I've never had a problem yet.
    He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep..to gain that which he cannot lose. Jim Elliot, 1949

    http://tonopahpictures.0catch.com

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