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  1. #21
    lee
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    I think building a camera around a 7x17 is an excellent idea. Make mine a 7x17 also.

    lee\c

  2. #22
    nick mulder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by barryjyoung
    I was wondering about that. Just gives me more incentive to produce them myself. I have had several wooden holders which I took apart to see what made them so expensive. The mystery was buried deep inside the holders I disassembled. It was simply that people like dough. Making film holders is not rocket science.
    I am yet to pull one apart but my next camera will be a 8x10 and I plan to make a holder also ... just need a lens and shutter with the coverage - rare, here in NZ

    a few other projects first tho to do with my 16mm cine cam ...

  3. #23
    noseoil's Avatar
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    Barry, if you plan on making the 7x17 holders, please find out about the "sizes" involved as has been mentioned. John at J&C had a small problem when he started selling 8x10 a couple of years ago, because he had film sliced which fit the new plastic film holders (the latest specs). As usual, he made good on any problem. Some of us were using older wood holders and the film was a couple of thousanths too wide to fit properly. You might check with him to see what is needed for the "correct size" which actually fits 7x17 (one size fits all?).

    I would like to see a 7x17 which is based on the rear frame type of construction, not a box. There was a link posted recently for a 16 x 20 on ebay out of Hong Kong that looked simple and relatively light, given the format involved. Simple, light, rigid, strong, with just enough movements to be practical gets my vote. Bellows draw was mentioned and I would vote for a minimum of 28" as well, but possibly more if it is practical. Something which folds into a backpack would be great. This is a fascinating format and seeing Matt's images out of Texas has been a boost for me. I hadn't considered this format until his pictures were posted. I like the idea of a kit with hardware. I have enough tools to finish the project, but machining metal is another aspect entirely beyond my means. Thanks for posting this thread. tim

  4. #24

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    As long as some are wishing...I think a 7x11, that doubles as an 8x10 and was under 10 lbs would be great (field camera of course), in leu of that I think a 7x17 is also a good choice.
    Mike C

    Rambles

  5. #25

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    I'm not a large format shooter yet, but when I become one, it's likely to be 7x17.

  6. #26
    MenacingTourist's Avatar
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    Why 7x17?

    I'm still pretty new to all this and wondered what makes the 7x17 format more appealing than other ULF formats like 4x10 and 12x20?

    Thanks in advance for the education

  7. #27
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    4x10 is a pretty small and intimate format. APS panos are often printed in about 4x10". It's fairly easy to do 4x10" with a half frame darkslide on an 8x10" camera.

    12x20" is a lot of camera.

    7x17" is a nice size for contact prints either in the hand or on the wall, an attractive panoramic shape, and the camera isn't so unwieldy as an 8x20" or larger camera. Lois Conner traveled around China with her 7x17" kit strapped across the rear rack of her bicycle. You couldn't do that so easily with an 8x20" or larger camera.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  8. #28

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    I would like 16x20 with the ability to add on reducing backs for 12x20, 8x20, 14x17 and maybe an interesting format like 16x16. The idea of a square ULF is pretty interesting.

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by nick mulder
    I am yet to pull one apart but my next camera will be a 8x10 and I plan to make a holder also ... just need a lens and shutter with the coverage - rare, here in NZ
    Nick.......there's more 810 shooters in NZ than you think.........I have quite a few shuttered lenses that cover and I know of plenty of others. I can lend you a holder to copy when you're ready.

    Clayton

  10. #30

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    How about a hugh cheap pinhole camera? Something like 11x14 or 16x20.

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