Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,271   Posts: 1,534,495   Online: 1105
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 28
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    108

    Glueing joints and light leaks?

    Okay so I finished sanding the kodak 3A, only problem is the sanding made the darn thing fall apart! The sides fit together using box joints (I think that is what they are called). The front attaches using butt joints. I'm wondering how these can be glued without causing light leaks?

  2. #2
    John Bartley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    13 Critchley Avenue, PO Box 36, Monteith Ont, P0K1P0
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    1,397
    Quote Originally Posted by egdinger
    Okay so I finished sanding the kodak 3A, only problem is the sanding made the darn thing fall apart! The sides fit together using box joints (I think that is what they are called). The front attaches using butt joints. I'm wondering how these can be glued without causing light leaks?

    I ony do woodworking as a hobby, so if anyone with real experience weighs in, I won't be insulted ..... I would clean up the the joints, removing the old glue but not removing any wood. Then I would dry fit them to make sure everything is going to assemble properly when the time comes. I would use ordinary carpenters glue such as "Tite-Bond" and once glued and assembled, I would clamp it TIGHT while making sure the corners are square. It's the tight clamping which will keep it light-tight. You can never have too many clamps .

    cheers

  3. #3
    bobfowler's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    New Jersey, Land of the Living Dead
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,440
    Images
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by John Bartley
    I ony do woodworking as a hobby, so if anyone with real experience weighs in, I won't be insulted ..... I would clean up the the joints, removing the old glue but not removing any wood. Then I would dry fit them to make sure everything is going to assemble properly when the time comes. I would use ordinary carpenters glue such as "Tite-Bond" and once glued and assembled, I would clamp it TIGHT while making sure the corners are square. It's the tight clamping which will keep it light-tight. You can never have too many clamps .

    cheers
    John hit the nail on the head - lots of clamps and keep her square. Once it's back together and you have the finish on the outside, there is no reason at all why you can't attack any lightleaks from the inside. FWIW, I use the flattest black paint I can find for the inside of lensboards and cameras. Krylon makes an ultra-flat "spray-bomb" that works very well.
    Bob Fowler
    fowler@verizon.net
    Some people are like Slinkies. They're really good for nothing, but they still bring a smile to your face when you push them down a flight of stairs.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Italia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,680
    You didn't sand the joints did you? Are they loose when you put it together? Or are they still tight? If they're loose you might want to consider one of the other glues. Something that fills gaps better.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Wilmette,Illinois, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    728
    If the joints are loose I recommend a polyurethane adhesive, Gorilla Glue is one brand. These expand and fill gaps very effectively, but the wood must be clamped well or the expanding glue can move it. It is a good idea to dampen the wood joints first as these adhesives react with water to cure. Also, be sure to use quite a bit less than you think you'll need, it does grow a lot. A few tests on scrap wouldn't hurt.

    Richard Wasserman

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    540
    Hi there,

    If you are worried about lightleaks, you can add 'printer toner dust' to the glue. Just mix it up in a pint size deli tub OUTSIDE, this stuff is messy.

    The polyurethane glues are nice but may have enough hydraulic force to break the finger joints on a 3A, try some 'tite-bond' or Elmer's yellow carpenter's glue.

    Good luck with it.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    108
    Thanks, so it looks like I'll just clamp it good and attack any light leaks from the inside.

  8. #8
    bobfowler's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    New Jersey, Land of the Living Dead
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,440
    Images
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by phfitz
    If you are worried about lightleaks, you can add 'printer toner dust' to the glue. Just mix it up in a pint size deli tub OUTSIDE, this stuff is messy.
    Now that is a novel approach! I've gotta give old toner a try, it should work like a charm...
    Bob Fowler
    fowler@verizon.net
    Some people are like Slinkies. They're really good for nothing, but they still bring a smile to your face when you push them down a flight of stairs.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Shooter
    Digital Negs
    Posts
    26

    Choice of adhesive for vintage wood cameras

    Hi. I would like to jump into this thread but also please don't think I am ranting or flaming because I take strong exception to all of your suggestions for an acceptable adhesive.

    None of the modern adhesives should be used when restoring vintage wood camera equipment for the same reasons that affect fine furniture restoration.

    Animal hide glue was used originally. With a failure figure of slightly more than 3000 lbs. per square inch it is almost the same in strength as the PVA based construction adhesives. Wood fails at or before this tensile strength.

    Ever notice that once a modern construction type adhesive has been used to repair a wooden joint that it doesn't fail but the wood around it does? The net result is destruction of the wood piece for all intents and purposes.

    A wood joint properly put together with hide glue is good for longer than any of use will live and well into our children's lifetimes and when it fails it can be restored easily and exactly as it was originally made.

    When dry and cured, hide glue wood joints will not stand up to water immersion but then how many of us are planning on drowning their cameras? Hide glue joints will withstand extremely high humidity expecially if the joint is shellacked (sp?) or varnished (that finish is on their for more reasons than it looks pretty).

    Aged glue joints made with hide glue are easy to take apart and clean up.

    Also, hide glue molecules are smaller (way smaller) than the micelles of the modern construction adhesives. This is why the modern construction adhesives don't penetrate into the wood and cannot be used for consolidating aging and porous wood. Old joints glued with these adhesives will not plump up and will be mechanically loose. Properly reglued with hide glue, these joints are tight.

    Last but not least, the evils (also includes the smell) of hot hide glue pots are a thing of the past with the modern versions. Yes you can run a glue pot if you wish to (I do) but I also use the cold versions which can be applied and worked with just like the PVA carpenter's adhesives.

    Basically, if you love your camera and have put the effort into refinishing and refurbishing it properly, finish the job.

    These cold application hide glues are the cat's meow for adhering leather and cloth to wood. Ever wonder how the leather on desks was applied?

    I hope I haven't offended anyone, it is not my intent. Only to inform.

    If anyone wants to contact me off list please do so.

    Regards

    Mark MacKenzie, M.A.C.
    Art Conservator
    Mark MacKenzie, M.A.C.
    Art Conservator
    Past Ink Publishing
    Saskatoon, Saskatchewan
    S7H 2S6

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    108
    I don't think your post was inflamitory in the least, and your position gives you some authority on the subject. I just used elemers wood glue. I don't think it is any kind of animal hide glue. But I wasn't doing a proper restoration on this camera, just something for fun.

    Problem is, one of the joints didn't go back togeather right and now it has light leaks, so what can I use from the inside to block the light?

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin