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  1. #11
    Curt's Avatar
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    I use a Systematic dado set ($$$) on a Powermatic 66 ($$$) and also have a Canadian made Leigh Dovetail Jig that does box joints also. It's a bit of a setup, the goal is a square bottom cut not done with most table saw blades. Of course a chisel and mallet can do wonders if you are skilled enough. I prefer the tool route myself.

    Have you hear of a Rotoplaner? I am luck to have one, it was made by Delta.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by rbarker
    I thought "real" woodworkers hand-cut their box joints with their dozukis and fine Japanese chisels.

    Seriously, these look like interesting blades, Bob. Thanks for the heads-up.

    That is how my dad always worked. Rarely used a power tool for any kind of joinery. So little time today to learn.. Could go through a lot of wood learning how with hand tools. Doing such fine work by hand brought my dad imense satisfaction with the completed peice.
    "Fundamentally I think we need to rediscover a non-ironic world"
    Robert Adams

  3. #13
    dylder's Avatar
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    I make and sell Pool Cue and Gun cases. I use a lot of box joints. The best, cheapest and easiest way I've found is this simple jig on a router table.

    dw
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails route1.jpg   route2.jpg   camCase.jpg  

  4. #14
    smieglitz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dylder
    ...The best, cheapest and easiest way I've found is this simple jig on a router table.

    dw
    dw,

    I'm such a woodworking newbie that I can't quite tell what is going on with the jig. Is it a board that has been dado grooved multiple times at a certain interval equivalent to the finger width?

    How do you square the piece for the first cut and what is that dark strip? Some sort of miter gauge groove?

    I'm taking an adult woodworking class at a local high school which has just recently been decked out in January with brand new, top-of-the-line Powermatic tools. The shop has the first planer of a certain type in the US (don't know what model but it is supposed to prevent that defect where the board is miscut a bit because of the rollers and table feed vary the end thickness of stock {can't remember what the defect is called}] and a fancy pneumatic dovetailing machine. Unfortunately the instructor has the dovetailer set up for large (3/4"?) dovetail joints instead of smaller box joints like those used in cameras. Last week the instructor was also assembling a 3-D router table that looks really slick. It has a horizontally-oriented router motor and bit and a series of stages that hold work and can be manipulated smoothly in the x,y, and z planes without removing the stock. He said it cost about $2000 but looks like it might be worth every penny.

    But anyways, my next session will be devoted to making the the front panel as well as the front and rear boxes of a camera so I'd appreciate any tips on how this jig works. I'm planning on the fingers to be 1/4". I had planned to either use an Incra jig on the router table or a series of 1/4" thick boards removed sequentially along the fence on the table saw to do the box joints, but if this jig is easier, I'd like to learn more about it.

    Thanks,

    Joe

  5. #15
    dylder's Avatar
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    Its just a flat piece of plywood with a hole in it for the bit. The dark strip / guide is a 1/4" strip of wood - dado'd into the plywood and stands about 1/4" proud of it. You simply clamp the plywood on the router table so the bit is exactly 1/4" from the guide (I use a 1/4" drill bit as the gage). Hold your work against the guide wood, push it through = 1st cut. Place that cut in the guide, push it through = 2nd, 3rd .... For the dark strip/guide I use cocobolo because its hard and has natural oils.

    I clamp several pieces together and sacrifice a scrap on the outside for chipout.

    Sorry about the photos, where it looks like the plywood is grooved, thats just sawdust from making joints.

    My tablesaw is a powermatic with a vega fence. Great tools.

    dw

  6. #16
    MenacingTourist's Avatar
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    Thanks for the heads up Bob. I'm with Curt and use an Akeda jig which is similar to the Leigh. Of course this required me to buy another router just to make things easier...Kind of like photography

  7. #17
    Curt's Avatar
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    And then there are the router bits to buy, it never ends does it? I have a Vega fence on my Powermatic also. It came as a package with a Bessemeyer (sp) fence but I had the Vega on another table saw and like it better. The other saw I have dedicated for metal cutting with a metal cutting blade for soft materials like aluminum and brass etc. I can make some aluminum lens boards with dados that are nice. I wanted to make furniture but my back is shot and I am looking for a good chair so I can sit at the bench and make some cameras instead. I hate the thoughts of spending money on a metal lathe and or mill though. How many pursuits are possible in a life time? I call it the curse of having ability. It's way too easy to get side tracked.

  8. #18
    bobfowler's Avatar
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    There's a really good woodworking store on RT22 in Union, NJ called Force Machinery. I could go broke just standing next to their router bit displays...
    Bob Fowler
    fowler@verizon.net
    Some people are like Slinkies. They're really good for nothing, but they still bring a smile to your face when you push them down a flight of stairs.

  9. #19
    bobfowler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MenacingTourist
    Thanks for the heads up Bob. I'm with Curt and use an Akeda jig which is similar to the Leigh. Of course this required me to buy another router just to make things easier...Kind of like photography
    One can never have too many routers... well... maybe 3 are enough...
    Bob Fowler
    fowler@verizon.net
    Some people are like Slinkies. They're really good for nothing, but they still bring a smile to your face when you push them down a flight of stairs.

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by bobfowler
    One can never have too many routers... well... maybe 3 are enough...
    I use this to make all my box joints, dovetails, signs, cabinets and nearly anything less than 8' x 12'... router

    erie


    then again this is what we have for a tv in our living room. (older pic from about 1 1/5 years ago, alot finished since then.

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