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  1. #1
    bobfowler's Avatar
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    Box joint blade set

    For those who haven't seen it yet, Freud is making a wonderful blade set for making box joints on the table saw, the SBOX8 Box Joint Cutter Set. I picked up a set over the weekend and they are FANTASTIC! The teeth are designed for cutting end-grain cleanly and a simple swap of blade position changes from a 1/4" to 3/8" joint. They are shown on the new products part of the Freud web page, scroll down and you'll find it. They're not that expensive (about $80.00) considering how much better they are box joints than a traditional stacked dado.
    Bob Fowler
    fowler@verizon.net
    Some people are like Slinkies. They're really good for nothing, but they still bring a smile to your face when you push them down a flight of stairs.

  2. #2

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    Bob,
    Thanks for the heads up, this looks very nice indeed. Is there much tearout on the back side of the cut, or is it as good as it sounds?

    Richard Wasserman

  3. #3
    bobfowler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by disfromage
    Bob,
    Thanks for the heads up, this looks very nice indeed. Is there much tearout on the back side of the cut, or is it as good as it sounds?

    Richard Wasserman
    With solid woods, there is little or no tear out. Plywood tends to splinter a little bit, but that will happen with just about any blade design. I cut some test joints with baltic birch ply, red oak, and cherry. The "real" woods cut beautifully. Going slow through the ply and using a sacrificial backing reduces that to almost nothing. I used thin masonite as the sacrificial material behind the birch.

    The set comes with instructions on making the necessary fence mounted jigs.
    Bob Fowler
    fowler@verizon.net
    Some people are like Slinkies. They're really good for nothing, but they still bring a smile to your face when you push them down a flight of stairs.

  4. #4
    John Bartley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobfowler
    ..... Going slow through the ply and using a sacrificial backing reduces that to almost nothing. I used thin masonite as the sacrificial material behind the birch.
    Yup - I agree with Bob on this. A sacrificial backing solves most if not all of the tearout problem. That's how I make mine, only I've been using a set of Delta dado blades and home made jigs.

    cheers

  5. #5

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    I use a backer also, I was just curious how good these blades are on their own. They sound very nice, I'll be ordering a set.

    Richard Wasserman

  6. #6
    bobfowler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by disfromage
    I use a backer also, I was just curious how good these blades are on their own. They sound very nice, I'll be ordering a set.

    Richard Wasserman
    I wouldn't use them as a single blade. A "normal" blade has teeth set alternating to both sides, these are set either to the left or right, which is why you just switch blade positions for the different joint sizes.
    Bob Fowler
    fowler@verizon.net
    Some people are like Slinkies. They're really good for nothing, but they still bring a smile to your face when you push them down a flight of stairs.

  7. #7

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    Just a quick prop for Freud. They make some excellent tools for the woodworking shop.
    "Fundamentally I think we need to rediscover a non-ironic world"
    Robert Adams

  8. #8
    David Brown's Avatar
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    Opps, oh, sorry. Thought I had stumbled into "rec.woodworking" there for a second ...


    (Glad to know I'm not the only toolhead here.)
    David
    Taking pictures is easy. Making photographs is hard.

    http://www.behance.net/silverdarkroom

  9. #9
    reellis67's Avatar
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    Interesting. I've always used Rockler for fine woodworking tools. Thanks for the tip!

    - Randy

  10. #10
    rbarker's Avatar
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    I thought "real" woodworkers hand-cut their box joints with their dozukis and fine Japanese chisels.

    Seriously, these look like interesting blades, Bob. Thanks for the heads-up.
    [COLOR=SlateGray]"You can't depend on your eyes if your imagination is out of focus." -Mark Twain[/COLOR]

    Ralph Barker
    Rio Rancho, NM

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