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  1. #1
    Dorothy Blum Cooper's Avatar
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    Making Glass Plate Film Holder Back...

    Rather than going to someone who makes glass plate holders, I'm considering making my own. Does anyone have any sketches, plans or diagrams on this?

    I want a nicely engineered back for my 40's Kodak Master View Camera since I'm venturing into wet plate work. My husband enjoys woodwork and we tend to be very particular so I thought I'd try asking here before attempting anything on our own.

    Any input, ideas, suggestions would be greatly appreciated!!

  2. #2

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    Alan Greene's book "Primitive Photography" would be a good resource for you to consult.

    Tom
    www.f295.org

  3. #3
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    Google for the address of the US patent office and do a search for patent #18,780 which is J. Stock's plate holder patent from December 1, 1857. It will be a good starting point.

    I think Wayne Pierce also has a few pics and sketches online. (Google "the company photographer").

    I've also attached an electronic drawing I've done to guide me in making a holder.

    Joe
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails wetplate_back_flat.jpg  

  4. #4

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    thanks smieglitz, here's the url:
    http://patimg2.uspto.gov/.piw?Docid=...y=1A4CA3FC5D7F

  5. #5

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    I second tperson's response regarding "Primitive Photography." A very useful book for what you are looking to do. The drawings could be a little better (he obviously never took a drafting class and learned line weights), but other than that it is excellent.

  6. #6
    Kerik's Avatar
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    Dorothy,

    If you're anxious to get started, the easiest and cheapest thing to do is modify an 8x10 filmholder. I made 2 this way, one for 5x7 and one for 6.5x8.5. You can see pictures here and here.
    Kerik Kouklis
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    2014 Workshop Schedule Online

  7. #7
    Jeremy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerik
    Dorothy,

    If you're anxious to get started, the easiest and cheapest thing to do is modify an 8x10 filmholder. I made 2 this way, one for 5x7 and one for 6.5x8.5. You can see pictures here and here.
    Kerik, can you give us some more detailed instructions on how to do this conversion? I guess I'm just too dense to go at it just from these pictures.
    Let's see what I've got in the magic trash can for Mateo!

    blog
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  8. #8
    Shinnya's Avatar
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    Jeremy,

    Here's another source:

    http://www.collodion.org/plateholderconversion.html

    Enjoy.

    Warmly,
    Tsuyoshi

    p.s.: I still have a couple of 8x10 plate holders...


    Quote Originally Posted by Jeremy Moore
    Kerik, can you give us some more detailed instructions on how to do this conversion? I guess I'm just too dense to go at it just from these pictures.
    ----- P R O J E C T B A S H O -----
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  9. #9
    Dorothy Blum Cooper's Avatar
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    If you're anxious to get started, the easiest and cheapest thing to do is modify an 8x10 filmholder.
    Kerik...me? Anxious? Whatever gave you that impression?

    Seriously...I really appreciate the visual of the self-made plate holders. Like Jeremy, I too would love to know how you did this.

    Tom, Joe, Terrence & Tsuyoshi...thank you so much for your suggestions!!

  10. #10
    Kerik's Avatar
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    Take a look at the link that Tsuhoshi provided. The only thing I did different was, instead of using the silver wires at the corners, I cut triangles out of the piece of the septum that I cut out, then epoxied them in place as shown in the pictures I posted. The only thing I'd do different than before is to move the triangles in a bit so there is a little more surface area for the plate to rest on.

    BTW, I have a couple of Tsuhoshi's dry plate holders. They are great, too. The only thing to be aware of is that you have to be meticulous about cleaning them after every plate, or you will get contamination problems (known as oysters by the wetheads) on subsequent plates. If you're still with me, the difference between a dry plate holder and wet plate holder is that a wet plate holder only suspends the plate by the corners, while the dry plate holder contacts the entire perimeter of the plate, so there is much more contact area that can cause contamination problems.
    Kerik Kouklis
    Platinum/Gum/Collodion
    www.kerik.com
    2014 Workshop Schedule Online

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