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  1. #11

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    I sliced up a finger pretty good on an end mill in the drill press. It doesn't work adn don't try it, it happens so fast you don't even feel it till the blood is running down your elbow and you see the ribbons of flesh.

    The best solution for your drill press is to get an X/Y vise for your drill press, bolt it to the table and then start cutting perfect slots without any danger. They aren't that expensive. Be sure not to try to cut the full depth on the first pass, do a bit at a time working the vise one side to the other side using the control screw.
    Anyone can make a Digital print, but only a photographer can make a photograph.

  2. #12
    Charles Webb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Bartley
    Just for the heck of it, I went out to the garage, found a chunk of scrap brass, 1"w x 1/4"thick x 4" long. I took out a 5/32" 4-flute end mill and then headed in to the basement to dado out a groove in a chunk of scrap pine. Here's the results.

    .
    Excellent, I learned to do that in high school shop class! Now show us the pictures of this device working with 22 ga. sheet stock.

    The jig or fixture you used disqualifies your results, as what you did is not considered "Free Handing". :-)

    Just having a bit of fun at Johns expense.
    Charlie..............................

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by John Bartley
    Just for the heck of it, I went out to the garage, found a chunk of scrap brass, 1"w x 1/4"thick x 4" long. I took out a 5/32" 4-flute end mill and then headed in to the basement to dado out a groove in a chunk of scrap pine. Here's the results.

    The pictures are :
    1) the setup - metal can't lift or fly out of either end
    2) milling bit and workpiece are securely clamped in a sandwich and in the spindle
    3) the finished milled slot - 1/2" long - took about 30 seconds in this 1/4" thick stock

    I didn't bother to research cutting speed, but the press was set at 480rpm for a circle cutter bit and it "seemed" about right. It cut very smoothly and left nice cool clean shavings.
    I like it! Good job. Now the problem. So far, the smallest mill bit I can find is 1/8" diameter that cuts a 3/16" slot. That's too big. I need smaller (like an 1/8"). Unless I haven't looked in the right places. I suspect the part that I'm trying to replicate (100yrs old) was stamped on a press, that made 10,000 of them. I need one. Oh well.

  4. #14
    John Bartley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charles Webb

    The jig or fixture you used disqualifies your results, as what you did is not considered "Free Handing". :-)

    Just having a bit of fun at Johns expense.
    Charlie..............................
    Hehehe - no worries on this end Charlie

    I learned about safety at a very young age. Started working on a farm at thirteen and my first full time job, fresh out of college was contract gold mining. I saw first hand my share of the results of unsafe practices including digging my stope boss out of a 45' deep mill hole.

    Credit where due - Paul Rons suggestion of a cross feed vise is an excellent one and I second it most heartily.

  5. #15
    John Bartley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by middlecalf
    I like it! Good job. Now the problem. So far, the smallest mill bit I can find is 1/8" diameter that cuts a 3/16" slot. That's too big. I need smaller (like an 1/8"). Unless I haven't looked in the right places. I suspect the part that I'm trying to replicate (100yrs old) was stamped on a press, that made 10,000 of them. I need one. Oh well.
    Here you go - 4 flute, TiN coating, 3/8" shank with 1/8" cutter size :

    http://www.kbctools.com/usa/Navigati...m?PDFPage=0121

    cheers

  6. #16
    rbarker's Avatar
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    Nice jig, John. I noticed that the company you linked to for the end mills also had a couple of nice X/Y cross-feed vises, too.
    [COLOR=SlateGray]"You can't depend on your eyes if your imagination is out of focus." -Mark Twain[/COLOR]

    Ralph Barker
    Rio Rancho, NM

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by rbarker
    I disagree with Greg. Sort of. The fact that you lost a finger in the first few milliseconds of the operation will be of minor concern compared the being skewered by the bar when it flies off the bit and penetrates your chest.

    I have a little Unimat machine, a combination micro-lathe and mill, that I bought years ago that is ideal for small work like this. Unfortunately, they ceased production back in the '80s, but units might be found on the used market.
    I have one of these Unimat combos and is hard to beat for simplicity
    Mark
    Mark Layne
    Nova Scotia
    and Barbados

  8. #18
    AZLF's Avatar
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    You might want to check your drill press to see if it uses a taper fit chuck.If so then there is a good chance you will drop the chuck on the work piece during the process. Taper fit chucks are designed for vertical downward force. Not lateral. If you are going to go for it anyway then for sure use a four flute end mill. If the work piece is a 16th" thick or greater then make a couple of passes rather than trying to hog it all out in one pass. Don't ask me how I know this. :rolleyes:


    Some good advice came in while I was typing. Yes! the compound vices work well for this. My first "mill" was a floor standing drill press with a compound vice bolted to it. And yes, it had a taper fit chuck. It became a bigger pita than it was worth. I ended up buying one of the mill/drills from Harbor Freight with about 20" of cross travel. I have cut slots as small as 1/16th" with it in steel.
    http://www.apug.org/gallery/showgallery.php?cat=500&ppuser=10716
    http://home.comcast.net/~rem700a/westviews.html

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by middlecalf
    I like it! Good job. Now the problem. So far, the smallest mill bit I can find is 1/8" diameter that cuts a 3/16" slot. That's too big. I need smaller (like an 1/8"). Unless I haven't looked in the right places. I suspect the part that I'm trying to replicate (100yrs old) was stamped on a press, that made 10,000 of them. I need one. Oh well.
    You can get end mills as small as .010 (IIRC), typically 2 flute, solid carbide. My usual source for these is ebay, however wholesale tools (www.wttool.com) as well as enco (www.use-enco.com) have them when I'm getting low and need one right away, look for carbide end mills. I must warn you to be sitting down, they're not cheap.


    erie

  10. #20

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    I'm now loaded for bear (or at least ordered "stuff"). "Stuff" includes cross slide vise, appropriate end mills and will see about the micro-tek filer after I cut a few pieces and how much clean-up is necessary. Great help and suggestions from all and many thanks.

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