Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,333   Posts: 1,537,452   Online: 1070
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 25
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    395
    Thanks everyone, it sounds like I should look at the smaller hobby lathes as I won't be making large retaining rings and I will stay away from combination machines.

    There isn't a local (i.e. Australian) equivalent to SK Grimes so I might do some hunting around to see if there is a local machinist who can make up the odd ring when I find a lens that I want to use on a regular basis. I've seen the iris holders but was dubious as to how much weight they could hold. Some of the old brass lenses are huge.

  2. #12
    Ole
    Ole is offline
    Ole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Bergen, Norway
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    9,281
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    31
    The iris mounts easily hold all but the very heaviest lenses. The 500mm f:5.5 Schneider Aerotar sits well since it's relatively short, even if it weight about 2kg. The 620mm f:3.5 Petzval is just too much, but by supporting the front of it with a second tripod that works well too!
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Dunedin,New Zealand
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    269
    Maybe not as elegant as a properly machined thread,but this method worked for me when I had to mount an EL-Nikkor 150 (wierd adapter size ) to a panel.
    First,ensure you have a slightly oversize hole. Grease the thread section on the lens with petroleum jelly. Fit lens to panel. Pack epoxy putty around the threads. As soon as the epoxy begins to set,unscrew the lens. The jelly prevents the putty adhering to the lens and you are left with a perfect impression of the lens threading, so the lens can be removed/replaced at will.
    If you require a permanent mounting , omit the jelly..

  4. #14
    Whiteymorange's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Boston area
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,275
    Images
    26
    Hot glue is wonderful stuff - and reversible when you screw up.

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    528
    Quote Originally Posted by paul ewins
    Thanks everyone, it sounds like I should look at the smaller hobby lathes as I won't be making large retaining rings and I will stay away from combination machines.
    Hi, Cousin

    A hobby lathe will handle almost everything you need. Being in the USA, I use a Sherline for these small jobs. If you're near a larger town, look for an auction of a closed machine shop - they always seem to pop up here. The benefit of the hobby lathe, though, is that you can pick it up and store it somewhere. Even a small 6" lathe will weight quite a lot.

    Don't be afraid of cutting threads. Even a hopeless hack like myself can produce workable lens rings. Make your first ones out of cheap plastic or nylon, e.g., Delrin.

    Practice. Read books. Have fun.

    Charley Ewen

  6. #16
    Jim Noel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,838
    Blog Entries
    1
    The thread cutter which is available for the Sherline is not difficult to master well enough to cut retaining rings.
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    479
    Images
    8
    Can the Sherline do the larger rings like, say, for a #5 shutter? Pardon my ignorance of this stuff, but what's the largest diameter work a small lathe like that can handle?
    Thanks,
    Nathan

  8. #18
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    North Carolina, USA (transplanted from Seattle)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,845
    The Sherline can, IIRC, swing 3.5 inch diameter over the bed (it's a pretty small lathe), though there are riser blocks for it that raise the headstock, tailstock, and carriage to let it swing 5.5 inches. The original chuck will only hold items up to something like 1.5 inches, but the spindle will take a lightweight 3-jaw or 4-jaw made for a Sieg mini-lathe (Shanghai-built 7x8, 12, 14, depending on model and vendor) with a suitable adapter plate. If you expect to need to work on a #5 shutter, I'd recommend getting a 7x lathe in the first place; these lathes are inexpensive, tooling is also quite reasonable, and they can handle 3.5 inch work diameter right out of the packing case (and they no longer require a complete rebuild before you do any work -- they've improved greatly in the 20 years since the first reviews were written; mine only needed the packing grease cleaned off, gibs adjusted, and a swipe with a file to take off the raised metal around the serial number stamping at the tail end of the ways).

    However, the Seig lathes are bastards relative to measurement -- mine has a 16 tpi lead screw, making it a major pain to cut metric threads, but has 1 mm pitch on the cross slide and compound screws (pretty close to .040" per turn, but not quite -- but the collars are marked as if it were). There are metric lead screws, half nuts, and threading gages available for these lathes, and you can change from one to the other in half an hour -- sometime when I have money, I hope to get a set. There are also true inch feed screws for the cross and compound, but that's less critical.

    Seig lathes, BTW, are sold under a wide variety of nameplates, including Harbor Freight, Homier, Busy Bee, Grizzly Tools, even Enco and MicroMark. Aside from the MicroMark 7x14 (different motor location, true inch screws throughout, and slightly stricter quality control), the only significant difference between any of them is the length of the bed and lead screw, and the color of the paint.
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

  9. #19
    Curt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,545
    Images
    15
    Donald which of the 7x lathes would you get if you had to choose. I have been pondering this for a while and would like to get one too. I recently got a hand knurler that has 6 different knurls with it. It's a hand knurler and is new. I am going to use it for knobs.

    I would like to take the time to learn to make retainers and threaded components.

    Regards,
    Curt

  10. #20
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    North Carolina, USA (transplanted from Seattle)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,845
    I bought (three-four years ago) a Homier Speedway 7x12 and haven't regretted it. I chose this particular 7x because it was the lowest priced, though it didn't include quite as much tooling as the other 7x12 offerings -- there was and is no other reason to choose, unless you can afford the slightly nicer MicroMark 7x14. I bought a 21T change gear kit to allow cutting "almost metric" threads (though at some point I'd like to get a pair of 50-127 gears in finer pitch that fit the banjo, it'd work better to get a true-metric threading screw and mating parts), 5" 4-jaw chuck, bored the center hole in the 3-jaw chuck to match the 13/16" spindle bore, and have bought some tool bits, boring bars, etc. -- I probably have $550 to $600 invested, total.

    Given the level of quality control these lathes have gotten in recent years, I wouldn't recommend a Sherline or Taig unless you need something as portable as a sewing machine (my 7x12 weighs close to 90 pounds with the chuck, carriage, and tailstock mounted). If you *do* need extreme portability, a Sherline with riser blocks is the lightest tool you can buy for the size work it can handle, but it's only capable of very light cuts on work more than a couple inches in diameter.

    If you have the money, a MicroMark is the way to go -- it's got true inch screws on cross slide and compound, and on the milling attachment, you can easily buy a metric long feed screw (plus matching split nut and threading indicator) to allow cutting correct metric threads, and also get true metric (i.e. marked in .01 mm instead of 1/40 mm) screws for the slides if needed. The extra two inches of bed will never come amiss, and the motor location is significantly better.

    Either way, you'll then want to bookmark littlemachineshop.com, *the* online source for tooling and parts for these lathes and their cousins, the mini-mills. If you had more money and time than sense, you could literally buy the parts from Little Machine Shop to build a complete mini-lathe from the ground up, including the motor, speed control circuit board, all fasteners, even the rubber feet. BTW, they also have metric lead screws available to fit all three sizes of 7x lathe, and the other parts that go with them -- you'll certainly want one of those if you're interested in making retaining rings, since you'll need to be able to cut 1.0, 0.75, and most likely other metric thread pitches (but also US/British pitches, not to mention modern, Whitworth, and BSA threads). I'll leave it up to you to become proficient doing so inside a tube end -- I still stick to outside threads, but I don't use my lathe as much as I wish I had time and material/tooling money to do.
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin