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  1. #11

    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Liverpool (UK), and Bangkok (Thailand)
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    50
    The nice thing about using pliers that are ground down is cost. A good spanner can be $50 or more. Old pliers---Priceless.
    Hmm, yes, that's a good point, spanners do seem to be a bit pricey. Maybe I'll dig out some old pliers and the grinding wheel

  2. #12
    frugal's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Halifax, NS, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    150
    Images
    11
    For the 50/1.8, you're right that it's probably not worth paying to fix. If you want to make an attempt on your own that's fine, you might also want to ask on the Olympus mailing list, odds are good that you can find somebody in the UK (there's a lot of UK subscribers) with a spare 50/1.8 they could let go of for a reasonable price. Or, you might want to step up to the 50/1.4. Depending on the characteristics and age of your 50/1.8 (there were several versions). That's what I did when my 1.8 died and I couldn't believe the difference. I think my 1.8 was an earlier version (don't remember the serial #) and I know my 1.4 is a later version (but probably not last), I swear I could shave with the thing it's so sharp!

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Liverpool (UK), and Bangkok (Thailand)
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    50
    Quote Originally Posted by frugal View Post
    For the 50/1.8, you're right that it's probably not worth paying to fix. If you want to make an attempt on your own that's fine, you might also want to ask on the Olympus mailing list, odds are good that you can find somebody in the UK (there's a lot of UK subscribers) with a spare 50/1.8 they could let go of for a reasonable price. Or, you might want to step up to the 50/1.4. Depending on the characteristics and age of your 50/1.8 (there were several versions). That's what I did when my 1.8 died and I couldn't believe the difference. I think my 1.8 was an earlier version (don't remember the serial #) and I know my 1.4 is a later version (but probably not last), I swear I could shave with the thing it's so sharp!
    Those suggestions make a lot of sense, thanks. But I actually already have two more 50mm lenses, a newish 1.8 and a 1.4 silvernose (I like the silvernose a lot - I get nice tonality with b&w with it), so my only reason for wanting to clean the dirty one is really just to practice before I attempt any important lenses.

    Best,
    Alan

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Huntington, NY
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    305
    There are no repair manuals for this type of Zuiko lenses. They are quite simple mechanisms and any technician with experience should be able to take them apart and repair them without assistance. Camera body manuals are available but even those are not step-by-step tutorials, it is assumed that you already have lots of repair knowledge or experience. John, www.zuiko.com

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Shooter
    Med. Format Pan
    Posts
    202
    Lost of useful info here:

    http://olympus.dementia.org/Hardware/

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Huntington, NY
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    305
    There are 5 types of 50 1.8. The last 3 have sealed front groups, which cannot be taken apart. Also parts are not available. I've seen lots of these over the years, and when I was subcontracting for Olympus America, replacement of the front assembly (for even a filter ring dent) was a daily thing. John

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