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  1. #51
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    Not to go totally off-topic and threadjack, but thinking of 5x12, I don't know who else has seen the thread about Kodak TMY2 being made in ULF/ELF (Exotic Large Format... so would Exotic Ultra-Large Format be EULF, or UELF?) sizes. It would be great if we could organize enough interest to get Kodak to cut 5x12 in this format. Post your interest in that thread, and email Glazer's Camera (they're the sales agent for this special deal) to let them know your interest level.

  2. #52

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    Quote Originally Posted by chrisf View Post
    Colin,

    If you don't need too much I could send you a small amount. I bought 3 sheets that are 20x28 at $10 per sheet with pressure sensitive adhesive. I'm sure I have enough for your holders. I think I bought mine here http://www.fpi-protostar.com/flock.htm.

    Let me know if I can help you out.
    Cool! Thanks a bunch for the link Chris. I'll probably order a few sheets of it, it looks like it would work great for a few other projects I've been meaning to start on; plus some other stuff I haven't even thought of yet. :-) Many thanks for the offer though.

  3. #53

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    For those asking me to make a mounting bracket, I couldn't make you one at a price that's fair to both of us, (not to mention Lotus, whose idea it was- if you want to buy one, please buy it from them) but I'd be happy to lay out the procedure I used to make mine- only takes a drill, a hacksaw, and a small flat file, and assorted wrenches for tightening the screws and bolts. The hardest part is gathering the materials. I got the aluminum extrusions, joining plates, screws and t-nuts from 80/20 on ebay that I linked earlier in the thread- I used 1"x2"- the 10 series, iirc. The knobs for mounting the camera I got from McMaster Carr. The coupling nut, lockwasher and bolt for mounting to the tripod I got from a local hardware store.

    Essentially, just miter the two arms of the bracket to join them at a right angle, then join with the angle plates. The ebay store might have pre-mitered pieces, then you'd only have to cut them to length. In fact, now that I think about it, you probably don't have to miter them at all- I just did it for a cleaner look. As long as at least 2 screws engage each side of the braket on each plate it'll be plenty strong. I used a bracket for each side.

    The t-nuts from 80/20 are flat in order to slide into the slots in the extrusions. I hold a square to the parts while screwing the plates on to make sure they are perpendicular. On mine, I made the vertical arm long enough to reach past center of the camera's mounting plate. The horizontal arm I made long enough to exactly center the camera's weight atop the tripod.

    For the tripod mount, get a coupling nut with a thread that matches your tripod's mounting screw. Drill a hole just under the diameter of the coupling nut. Use a nut that is the full length of the extrusion's thickness (I used 1" thick pieces, so the nut was 1" long.) Mark the hexagonal sides of the nut out on the aluminum and file the hole to fit. Important to the get this snug, slop might make the nut round over and spin, making it impossible to tighten fully to the tripod. In the least, it'll likely fall out when not connected to the tripod. (If necessary, you could probably fill gaps with epoxy or bondo, but I haven't found anything that sticks very well to aluminum.) Tapping the nut into the hole with light hammer taps will mark where you need to file more. Once inserted, secure from the top with a lockwasher and bolt, make sure you have enough thread in the nut left to accommodate the tripod mounting screw from below. I think I used a 3/8" bolt, which left 5/8" of clearance for the mounting screw. Filing the mortise for the nut is by far the most tedious and time consuming step, but the most important one.

    For the camera mounting knobs, I drilled oversized holes for the thread, then fished a retaining nut into the hollow of the extrusion so that the knobs won't come unscrewed when unmounted from the camera and get lost. I used cage nuts- flat nuts that look like they were cut from sheet metal, also from the local Ace hardware. But you could skip this step and just keep the knobs safe somewhere when not in use. I do recommend two camera mounting knobs to keep the camera from tilting inadvertently. But this might require tapping new holes into your camera plate, depending on the camera.

    Hope this makes sense, and please ask if you have any questions.
    Last edited by Colin Graham; 11-16-2008 at 10:47 AM. Click to view previous post history.

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